Document Type

Article

Publication Date

2015

Abstract

Is Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics (STEM) truly for all? According to the literature, it is rare to find gifted and talented Black and Latino Students who are engaged in STEM (C. G. Wright, 2011; LSA, 2005; Scott, 2010; Speight & Weatherspoon, 2009). They are virtually invisible in these majors and careers. While Caucasians and Asians view STEM careers as a world of opportunities, Blacks and Latinos see them as challenging and inaccessible (The Center on Education and Work, 2008). This results from a lack of exposure to STEM in K - 12 education, mathematics phobias, students’ misperceptions of what science is, lack of real-life application of science, lack of motivation to succeed, and peer pressure that devalues high achievement (Flores, 2007; PEW, 2005; Scott, 2010; QEMN, 2010). Black and Latino students tend to pursue familiar areas, such as the arts or athletics where they are sure they can excel because their role models have excelled in those areas already (Schlesinger, 2005).

Comments

IAGC Journal

Table 4-1.pdf (68 kB)
Insert Table 4 after Table 3 on page 73

Share

COinS
 
 

To view the content in your browser, please download Adobe Reader or, alternately,
you may Download the file to your hard drive.

NOTE: The latest versions of Adobe Reader do not support viewing PDF files within Firefox on Mac OS and if you are using a modern (Intel) Mac, there is no official plugin for viewing PDF files within the browser window.