Event Title

An Examination of The Correlation of a Child’s Background to Their Enjoyment and Outlook on Science As Well as if it Changes Over Time

Session Number

I04

Advisor(s)

Bryan Wunar, Museum of Science and Industry

Location

A-123

Start Date

28-4-2016 8:50 AM

End Date

28-4-2016 9:15 AM

Disciplines

Education

Abstract

Although the population of America (and more specifically Chicago) is incredibly diverse, we are far from having equal representation and diversity in Science, Technology, Engineering, and Math (STEM) fields. Furthermore, research suggests that enthusiasm in science is more likely to lead to a STEM related college degree than top performance on science tests. My investigation researched how a child’s race, gender, and background can influence their opinion and enthusiasm on science. The subjects, mostly kids aged 3-15, were participating in a science exploration program and subject to two surveys given out two days apart. They responded to questions inquiring about their dream job, how they feel about science, and who they think science is for. After analyzing their data, the results suggest many children are capable and open- minded, as well as have the equal enthusiasm for learning science regardless of race, age, or gender. Although I am not able to extrapolate this data to the future to see what these kids become, these results may help us understand the general state of kids today and exactly what changes between their opinions in childhood and their actual jobs in adulthood.


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Apr 28th, 8:50 AM Apr 28th, 9:15 AM

An Examination of The Correlation of a Child’s Background to Their Enjoyment and Outlook on Science As Well as if it Changes Over Time

A-123

Although the population of America (and more specifically Chicago) is incredibly diverse, we are far from having equal representation and diversity in Science, Technology, Engineering, and Math (STEM) fields. Furthermore, research suggests that enthusiasm in science is more likely to lead to a STEM related college degree than top performance on science tests. My investigation researched how a child’s race, gender, and background can influence their opinion and enthusiasm on science. The subjects, mostly kids aged 3-15, were participating in a science exploration program and subject to two surveys given out two days apart. They responded to questions inquiring about their dream job, how they feel about science, and who they think science is for. After analyzing their data, the results suggest many children are capable and open- minded, as well as have the equal enthusiasm for learning science regardless of race, age, or gender. Although I am not able to extrapolate this data to the future to see what these kids become, these results may help us understand the general state of kids today and exactly what changes between their opinions in childhood and their actual jobs in adulthood.