Event Title

Creating a Second, Chemical Stage for Germicidal, Ceramic Filters

Session Number

J09

Advisor(s)

Mark Carlson, Illinois Mathematics and Science Academy

Location

A-129

Start Date

28-4-2016 8:00 AM

End Date

28-4-2016 8:25 AM

Disciplines

Education

Abstract

To remove agrochemicals such as pesticides from drinking water, a second stage was developed for antibacterial clay filters. These filters help kill bacteria in drinking water and must be affordable and readily available for people in the developing world. A chemical stage would have to be so as well. Activated carbon is a porous material that has the ability to adsorb small molecules like agrochemicals, which makes it an ideal filter material. The activated carbon was placed above the clay filters separated by multiple coffee filters. A bleach solution containing 4% sodium hypochlorite was passed through the filters and its concentration was measured using light absorbance. The concentration of the bleach solution was lowered by as much as a factor of 2. The conclusion from these results is that the activated carbon does decrease the concentration of bleach in the water. Preliminary results show that activated carbon has the potential to remove trichlorfon, a pesticide, from water as well.


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Apr 28th, 8:00 AM Apr 28th, 8:25 AM

Creating a Second, Chemical Stage for Germicidal, Ceramic Filters

A-129

To remove agrochemicals such as pesticides from drinking water, a second stage was developed for antibacterial clay filters. These filters help kill bacteria in drinking water and must be affordable and readily available for people in the developing world. A chemical stage would have to be so as well. Activated carbon is a porous material that has the ability to adsorb small molecules like agrochemicals, which makes it an ideal filter material. The activated carbon was placed above the clay filters separated by multiple coffee filters. A bleach solution containing 4% sodium hypochlorite was passed through the filters and its concentration was measured using light absorbance. The concentration of the bleach solution was lowered by as much as a factor of 2. The conclusion from these results is that the activated carbon does decrease the concentration of bleach in the water. Preliminary results show that activated carbon has the potential to remove trichlorfon, a pesticide, from water as well.