Event Title

Investigation on the Decomposition of Sugar Substitutes in Simulated Blood

Session Number

A08

Advisor(s)

Sowmya Anjur, Illinois Mathematics and Science Academy

Location

B-101

Start Date

28-4-2016 9:15 AM

End Date

28-4-2016 9:40 AM

Disciplines

Biochemistry

Abstract

In recent years several arguments have been raised as to whether sugar substitutes help or harm us. This SIR investigation is focused on researching the effects of sugar substitutes in simulated blood. This was completed through both a literature search and lab experimentation. Simulated blood and amylase (0.1% solution in buffer) were used in the lab investigation, amylase represents the salivary amylase that breaks down food when ingested. Sugar and sugar substitutes were added to the simulated blood in the recommended serving sizes. The amylase solution would be allowed to react with the simulated bloodsugar substitute mix, and glucose strips would be used to determine if any glucose was present. The results indicated that there was little to no glucose found in the sugar substitutes. The only substitutes where glucose was detected were aspartame and stevia. The literature search showed that the sugar substitutes broke down into glucose in simulated blood, but not in the body. To conclude, aspartame might increase blood glucose levels in humans when used as directed. Further research may be necessary to conclude whether aspartame is harmful or not.


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Apr 28th, 9:15 AM Apr 28th, 9:40 AM

Investigation on the Decomposition of Sugar Substitutes in Simulated Blood

B-101

In recent years several arguments have been raised as to whether sugar substitutes help or harm us. This SIR investigation is focused on researching the effects of sugar substitutes in simulated blood. This was completed through both a literature search and lab experimentation. Simulated blood and amylase (0.1% solution in buffer) were used in the lab investigation, amylase represents the salivary amylase that breaks down food when ingested. Sugar and sugar substitutes were added to the simulated blood in the recommended serving sizes. The amylase solution would be allowed to react with the simulated bloodsugar substitute mix, and glucose strips would be used to determine if any glucose was present. The results indicated that there was little to no glucose found in the sugar substitutes. The only substitutes where glucose was detected were aspartame and stevia. The literature search showed that the sugar substitutes broke down into glucose in simulated blood, but not in the body. To conclude, aspartame might increase blood glucose levels in humans when used as directed. Further research may be necessary to conclude whether aspartame is harmful or not.