Event Title

Analysis of the Affect Auditory Stimuli have on Brain States and Networks Using Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging

Session Number

Q34

Advisor(s)

Todd Parrish, Northwestern University

Location

A-123

Start Date

28-4-2016 9:15 AM

End Date

28-4-2016 9:40 AM

Disciplines

Neuroscience and Neurobiology

Abstract

The brain has a default mode of functioning based upon the observed activation of particular brain networks when no explicit task is performed which can be referred to as resting state. The purpose of this study was to examine the affect auditory stimuli had on resting state and which brain networks were activated as we increased the complexity of the stimuli consisting of silence, tones, music, words and a story. These stimuli were played while a subject was scanned using functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging (fMRI) without performing an explicit task with their eyes closed. We analyzed the data collected from these scans using Northwestern University’s Neuroimaging Data Archive’s (NUNDA) resting fMRI analysis. We expected the images we collected to show that while the less complex stimuli are played brain networks associated with resting state will be active but as the stimuli become more complex other brain networks, particularly the language network, will be activated. However, initial results have been inconclusive. These results will tell us how the complexities of auditory stimuli affect which brain networks are active.


Share

COinS
 
Apr 28th, 9:15 AM Apr 28th, 9:40 AM

Analysis of the Affect Auditory Stimuli have on Brain States and Networks Using Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging

A-123

The brain has a default mode of functioning based upon the observed activation of particular brain networks when no explicit task is performed which can be referred to as resting state. The purpose of this study was to examine the affect auditory stimuli had on resting state and which brain networks were activated as we increased the complexity of the stimuli consisting of silence, tones, music, words and a story. These stimuli were played while a subject was scanned using functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging (fMRI) without performing an explicit task with their eyes closed. We analyzed the data collected from these scans using Northwestern University’s Neuroimaging Data Archive’s (NUNDA) resting fMRI analysis. We expected the images we collected to show that while the less complex stimuli are played brain networks associated with resting state will be active but as the stimuli become more complex other brain networks, particularly the language network, will be activated. However, initial results have been inconclusive. These results will tell us how the complexities of auditory stimuli affect which brain networks are active.