Event Title

Hippocampal Functional Connectivity in Breast Cancer Patients with CRCI

Session Number

Q843

Advisor(s)

Alexandra Apple, Northwestern University
Lei Wang, Northwestern University

Location

A-133

Start Date

28-4-2016 9:15 AM

End Date

28-4-2016 9:40 AM

Disciplines

Neuroscience and Neurobiology

Abstract

Chemotherapy-related cognitive impairment (CRCI) can result in changes in memory, attention, and motor skills in cancer patients. These impairments can be short-term or affect patients for the rest of their lives. Previous studies have shown that functional connectivity is abnormal in hippocampi for situations involving cognitive decline, such as traumatic brain injury and Alzheimer's disease. Therefore, we hypothesized that a change in hippocampal functional connectivity may be present in CRCI. The hippocampus is a part of the default mode network, which is activated when the brain is not focused on a specific task. Thus, acquiring resting state functional magnetic resonance imaging (rsfMRI) data where the patient is not given a task could provide insight for the effects of CRCI. We utilized a novel taskregression technique to obtain pseudo-rsfMRI data from event-blocked data. Then, we compared resting state functional connectivity in breast cancer patients and normal patients. Preliminary results suggest that there is decreased hippocampal functional connectivity in breast cancer patients; however, definitive statistical analyses are needed to support this assertion.


Share

COinS
 
Apr 28th, 9:15 AM Apr 28th, 9:40 AM

Hippocampal Functional Connectivity in Breast Cancer Patients with CRCI

A-133

Chemotherapy-related cognitive impairment (CRCI) can result in changes in memory, attention, and motor skills in cancer patients. These impairments can be short-term or affect patients for the rest of their lives. Previous studies have shown that functional connectivity is abnormal in hippocampi for situations involving cognitive decline, such as traumatic brain injury and Alzheimer's disease. Therefore, we hypothesized that a change in hippocampal functional connectivity may be present in CRCI. The hippocampus is a part of the default mode network, which is activated when the brain is not focused on a specific task. Thus, acquiring resting state functional magnetic resonance imaging (rsfMRI) data where the patient is not given a task could provide insight for the effects of CRCI. We utilized a novel taskregression technique to obtain pseudo-rsfMRI data from event-blocked data. Then, we compared resting state functional connectivity in breast cancer patients and normal patients. Preliminary results suggest that there is decreased hippocampal functional connectivity in breast cancer patients; however, definitive statistical analyses are needed to support this assertion.