Event Title

Effects of Computerized Note-taking Versus Handwritten Note-taking on the Test Scores of Illinois Mathematics and Science Academy Students

Session Number

T03

Advisor(s)

Amy Keck, Illinois Mathematics and Science Academy

Location

A-135

Start Date

28-4-2016 8:50 AM

End Date

28-4-2016 9:15 AM

Disciplines

Social and Behavioral Sciences

Abstract

Taking notes has been found to increase recollection of facts from reading and lectures, although research contradicts whether computerized or pen-and-paper notes produce better test scores. Our research was to study whether typed or handwritten notes were more effective for retaining information for tests and quizzes. Our objective was to see which of these two methods appear to produce better test scores among IMSA students. Data was collected from classes who agreed to participate in the anonymous study. Each student indicated on the quiz which method they used to take notes and we compared the two methods for each assessment. We also worked in IMSA’s dormitories, where we made our own lessons for students to take notes on and then complete a quiz. As collected with class data, each student anonymously indicated note-taking method then took the quiz. The findings of our research will better enable others to select a method to more effectively take notes. The results of our research will be presented at IMSAloquium.


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Apr 28th, 8:50 AM Apr 28th, 9:15 AM

Effects of Computerized Note-taking Versus Handwritten Note-taking on the Test Scores of Illinois Mathematics and Science Academy Students

A-135

Taking notes has been found to increase recollection of facts from reading and lectures, although research contradicts whether computerized or pen-and-paper notes produce better test scores. Our research was to study whether typed or handwritten notes were more effective for retaining information for tests and quizzes. Our objective was to see which of these two methods appear to produce better test scores among IMSA students. Data was collected from classes who agreed to participate in the anonymous study. Each student indicated on the quiz which method they used to take notes and we compared the two methods for each assessment. We also worked in IMSA’s dormitories, where we made our own lessons for students to take notes on and then complete a quiz. As collected with class data, each student anonymously indicated note-taking method then took the quiz. The findings of our research will better enable others to select a method to more effectively take notes. The results of our research will be presented at IMSAloquium.