Event Title

Using Electroencephalography and Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging to Identify Regions of Epileptic Seizure

Session Number

Q13

Advisor(s)

Todd Parrish, Northwestern University

Location

A-123

Start Date

28-4-2016 8:00 AM

End Date

28-4-2016 8:25 AM

Disciplines

Neuroscience and Neurobiology

Abstract

Our project sets out to find the effects of combining both electroencephalography (EEG) and functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) to pinpoint the regions of epilepsy in the human brain. On their own, MRIs and EEGs are useful in diagnosis, but the combination of the two is expected to be even more powerful in terms of spatial and temporal resolution. In order to collect our data, tests were run on patients diagnosed with epilepsy in the forms of the both fMRI and EEG. The patient completed simple motor tasks during scans, and then the data was analyzed for regions. At the moment, we do not have enough data to determine definite results or conclusions, but we expect to see a correlation in the EEG data with the fMRI activity, and if a correlation exists, then we are further able to determine those regions data with the fMRI activity, and if a correlation exists, then we are further able to determine those regions of epilepsy.


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Apr 28th, 8:00 AM Apr 28th, 8:25 AM

Using Electroencephalography and Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging to Identify Regions of Epileptic Seizure

A-123

Our project sets out to find the effects of combining both electroencephalography (EEG) and functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) to pinpoint the regions of epilepsy in the human brain. On their own, MRIs and EEGs are useful in diagnosis, but the combination of the two is expected to be even more powerful in terms of spatial and temporal resolution. In order to collect our data, tests were run on patients diagnosed with epilepsy in the forms of the both fMRI and EEG. The patient completed simple motor tasks during scans, and then the data was analyzed for regions. At the moment, we do not have enough data to determine definite results or conclusions, but we expect to see a correlation in the EEG data with the fMRI activity, and if a correlation exists, then we are further able to determine those regions data with the fMRI activity, and if a correlation exists, then we are further able to determine those regions of epilepsy.