Event Title

Biochemical Analysis of Ketamine Metabolites Using Liquid Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry

Session Number

A12

Advisor(s)

Eugene Chang, University of Chicago
Kyle Dolan, University of Chicago

Location

A-113

Start Date

28-4-2016 11:05 AM

End Date

28-4-2016 11:30 AM

Disciplines

Biochemistry

Abstract

In order to determine if drug metabolism is affected by a change in diet, urine samples from ketamine and saline treated mice were collected in order to determine the rate at which ketamine metabolized into norketamine. We wanted to look at the effects of dietary fat on constitutive androstane receptor-regulated (CAR) drug metabolism, since CAR has been found to be an anti-obesity nuclear receptor. We observed the differences in the rate of ketamine metabolism between mice fed an 18% milk-fat (MF) diet and mice fed a low-fat (LF) diet. Mouse urine samples were extracted using solid phase extraction columns and analyzed using a liquid chromatography- tandem mass spectrometry machine. We determined the limit of detection and the limit of quantification and used an internal standard to detect ketamine and norketamine in mouse urine. After 300 minutes, the average amount of norketamine and ketamine in the sample of mice fed the LF diet was lower than the mice fed the MF diet. This could indicate that the mice on the LF diet metabolized the ketamine and norketamine more efficiently by a slight margin. However, our sample size was too small to accurately report any statistical significance.


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Apr 28th, 11:05 AM Apr 28th, 11:30 AM

Biochemical Analysis of Ketamine Metabolites Using Liquid Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry

A-113

In order to determine if drug metabolism is affected by a change in diet, urine samples from ketamine and saline treated mice were collected in order to determine the rate at which ketamine metabolized into norketamine. We wanted to look at the effects of dietary fat on constitutive androstane receptor-regulated (CAR) drug metabolism, since CAR has been found to be an anti-obesity nuclear receptor. We observed the differences in the rate of ketamine metabolism between mice fed an 18% milk-fat (MF) diet and mice fed a low-fat (LF) diet. Mouse urine samples were extracted using solid phase extraction columns and analyzed using a liquid chromatography- tandem mass spectrometry machine. We determined the limit of detection and the limit of quantification and used an internal standard to detect ketamine and norketamine in mouse urine. After 300 minutes, the average amount of norketamine and ketamine in the sample of mice fed the LF diet was lower than the mice fed the MF diet. This could indicate that the mice on the LF diet metabolized the ketamine and norketamine more efficiently by a slight margin. However, our sample size was too small to accurately report any statistical significance.