Event Title

Novel Organic Light-Emitting Diode Materials Testing Method

Session Number

J13

Advisor(s)

John Thurmond, Illinois Mathematics and Science Academy

Location

A-119

Start Date

28-4-2016 10:15 AM

End Date

28-4-2016 10:40 AM

Disciplines

Engineering

Abstract

Organic LEDs (OLEDs) are better versions of the well-known LED that have many more practical applications, but are more expensive to produce and difficult to test at this time. Small batches of tris(bipyridine)ruthenium(II) complex ion and polyvinyl alcohol solutions are mixed and then spin-coated onto a 1” by 1” Indium-Tin oxide glass slide, which has a conductive layer on one side. Each slide is then placed into a drying oven and left for a week. Once dried, each slide is prepared with multiple layers including a cathode. A small current is put through the device to check for any luminescence from the material. Results thus far have shown that spin-coating each slide at a higher speed (3500rpm) vs. lower speed (1500rpm) is more effective because thin layers of solution are desirable. Because of the fast degradation of the materials, mixing and coating each solution iteration in the same lab day is the best method of testing, as the Ru-complex ion degrades in moist environments. Four testing devices have produced light thus far. These results show promise for testing other materials for luminescence with this method, but more work is needed to make a dependable process.


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Apr 28th, 10:15 AM Apr 28th, 10:40 AM

Novel Organic Light-Emitting Diode Materials Testing Method

A-119

Organic LEDs (OLEDs) are better versions of the well-known LED that have many more practical applications, but are more expensive to produce and difficult to test at this time. Small batches of tris(bipyridine)ruthenium(II) complex ion and polyvinyl alcohol solutions are mixed and then spin-coated onto a 1” by 1” Indium-Tin oxide glass slide, which has a conductive layer on one side. Each slide is then placed into a drying oven and left for a week. Once dried, each slide is prepared with multiple layers including a cathode. A small current is put through the device to check for any luminescence from the material. Results thus far have shown that spin-coating each slide at a higher speed (3500rpm) vs. lower speed (1500rpm) is more effective because thin layers of solution are desirable. Because of the fast degradation of the materials, mixing and coating each solution iteration in the same lab day is the best method of testing, as the Ru-complex ion degrades in moist environments. Four testing devices have produced light thus far. These results show promise for testing other materials for luminescence with this method, but more work is needed to make a dependable process.