Event Title

In Vivo Identification of Tumor Cells in the Sentinel Lymph Node

Session Number

A09

Advisor(s)

Chengyue Li, Illinois Institute of Technology
Kenneth Tichauer, Illinois Institute of Technology

Location

B-110

Start Date

28-4-2016 9:50 AM

End Date

28-4-2016 10:15 AM

Disciplines

Biochemistry

Abstract

The purpose of this investigation was to determine if the PAISLY (Paired-agent imaging of sentinel lymph nodes) was an effective method to non-invasively detect the presence of tumor cells in the sentinel lymph node. In this investigation, human breast cancer cells were grown in female nude mice, until the tumor cells metastasized into the lymphatic system. Fluorescent anti-EGFR antibodies were then injected into the mice, and the uptake of this imaging agent in the sentinel lymph node was imaged using the custom ARTEMIS Scanner for the next 3 hours using 10 minute intervals. The process was repeated using a paired imaging agent instead of the anti-EGFR antibodies. There were also mice who were injected with untargeted imaging agent and scanned for the same time. There was no correlation between level of fluorescence in the lymph nodes and the number of cancer cells present in the lymph node when using the anti-EGFR. When compared to the control, the two had very similar patterns of uptake and retention. The PAISLY method however was accurately able to detect fewer than 200 cancer cells in the sentinel lymph node, making it extremely accurate.


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Apr 28th, 9:50 AM Apr 28th, 10:15 AM

In Vivo Identification of Tumor Cells in the Sentinel Lymph Node

B-110

The purpose of this investigation was to determine if the PAISLY (Paired-agent imaging of sentinel lymph nodes) was an effective method to non-invasively detect the presence of tumor cells in the sentinel lymph node. In this investigation, human breast cancer cells were grown in female nude mice, until the tumor cells metastasized into the lymphatic system. Fluorescent anti-EGFR antibodies were then injected into the mice, and the uptake of this imaging agent in the sentinel lymph node was imaged using the custom ARTEMIS Scanner for the next 3 hours using 10 minute intervals. The process was repeated using a paired imaging agent instead of the anti-EGFR antibodies. There were also mice who were injected with untargeted imaging agent and scanned for the same time. There was no correlation between level of fluorescence in the lymph nodes and the number of cancer cells present in the lymph node when using the anti-EGFR. When compared to the control, the two had very similar patterns of uptake and retention. The PAISLY method however was accurately able to detect fewer than 200 cancer cells in the sentinel lymph node, making it extremely accurate.