Event Title

Frequency of Marijuana Use and its Impact on Skill Development and Academic Achievement in Homeless Youth Populations

Session Number

S07

Advisor(s)

Scott Hunter, University of Chicago

Location

A-131

Start Date

28-4-2016 11:05 AM

End Date

28-4-2016 11:30 AM

Disciplines

Psychology

Abstract

Homeless youth populations are exposed to numerous external factors that impact their development. Heavy substance abuse, in specific marijuana use, is common in these populations. The purpose of this study is to examine the frequency of marijuana use and its impact on executive functioning and academic development in emerging homeless youth populations. Interviews were administered to one-hundred forty- eight individuals ranging in age from 18-22 years old. Participants in the study were given the Wechsler Abbreviated Scale of Intelligence (WASI) test, the Wide Range Achievement Test (WRAT), and the California Verbal Learning Test (CVLT), measuring IQ, academic achievement, and memory, respectively. The Youth Risk Behavior Survey was also administered to define heavy use in the sample population. Similar studies have found that frequent exposure to cannabis has had negative effects on IQ, impairs emotional memory, and cognitive performance. Preliminary findings have suggested that heavy use will have a similar impact on executive functioning and academic development in homeless youth populations.


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Apr 28th, 11:05 AM Apr 28th, 11:30 AM

Frequency of Marijuana Use and its Impact on Skill Development and Academic Achievement in Homeless Youth Populations

A-131

Homeless youth populations are exposed to numerous external factors that impact their development. Heavy substance abuse, in specific marijuana use, is common in these populations. The purpose of this study is to examine the frequency of marijuana use and its impact on executive functioning and academic development in emerging homeless youth populations. Interviews were administered to one-hundred forty- eight individuals ranging in age from 18-22 years old. Participants in the study were given the Wechsler Abbreviated Scale of Intelligence (WASI) test, the Wide Range Achievement Test (WRAT), and the California Verbal Learning Test (CVLT), measuring IQ, academic achievement, and memory, respectively. The Youth Risk Behavior Survey was also administered to define heavy use in the sample population. Similar studies have found that frequent exposure to cannabis has had negative effects on IQ, impairs emotional memory, and cognitive performance. Preliminary findings have suggested that heavy use will have a similar impact on executive functioning and academic development in homeless youth populations.