Event Title

Genuine and Non-Genuine Smiles in Married Couples: Associations with Well-Being

Session Number

T05

Advisor(s)

Claudia Haase, Northwestern University
Taylor Shelton, Northwestern University
Ryan Svoboda, Northwestern University
Sara Thomas, Northwestern University

Location

B-108

Start Date

28-4-2016 10:15 AM

End Date

28-4-2016 10:40 AM

Disciplines

Social and Behavioral Sciences

Abstract

The present laboratory-based study investigates associations between spouses’ genuine and non-genuine smiles during a marital conflict discussion and well-being (i.e., life satisfaction; marital satisfaction). Fourteen married couples (N = 28 spouses) engaged in 10-minute video-recorded conversations about a disagreement in their marriage. Two trained raters coded the frequency of genuine (i.e., Duchenne) and non-genuine (i.e., non-Duchenne) smiles during the conversation using the Faction Action Coding System. Life satisfaction and marital satisfaction were assessed using well- established questionnaire measures and showed high internal consistency. We expect that spouses with (a) greater levels of genuine smiles and (b) a greater ratio of genuine to non-genuine smiles will show greater life satisfaction and greater marital satisfaction. We also explore whether (c) greater overall levels of smiling will be linked to greater marital satisfaction. Findings will be controlled for gender (as we expect women to smile more). The expression of non-genuine smiles may be a meaningful predictor of lower individual and relational well-being. Future research could investigate potential mechanisms for this relationship.


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Apr 28th, 10:15 AM Apr 28th, 10:40 AM

Genuine and Non-Genuine Smiles in Married Couples: Associations with Well-Being

B-108

The present laboratory-based study investigates associations between spouses’ genuine and non-genuine smiles during a marital conflict discussion and well-being (i.e., life satisfaction; marital satisfaction). Fourteen married couples (N = 28 spouses) engaged in 10-minute video-recorded conversations about a disagreement in their marriage. Two trained raters coded the frequency of genuine (i.e., Duchenne) and non-genuine (i.e., non-Duchenne) smiles during the conversation using the Faction Action Coding System. Life satisfaction and marital satisfaction were assessed using well- established questionnaire measures and showed high internal consistency. We expect that spouses with (a) greater levels of genuine smiles and (b) a greater ratio of genuine to non-genuine smiles will show greater life satisfaction and greater marital satisfaction. We also explore whether (c) greater overall levels of smiling will be linked to greater marital satisfaction. Findings will be controlled for gender (as we expect women to smile more). The expression of non-genuine smiles may be a meaningful predictor of lower individual and relational well-being. Future research could investigate potential mechanisms for this relationship.