Event Title

What is the Role of Clostridium difficile Carriage in Inflammatory Bowel Disease

Session Number

P05

Advisor(s)

Dejan Micic, University of Chicago
David Rubin, University of Chicago

Location

A-121

Start Date

28-4-2016 11:05 AM

End Date

28-4-2016 11:30 AM

Disciplines

Medicine and Health Sciences

Abstract

Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is an autoimmune condition that results in inflammation of the intestines. Clostridium difficile is a bacteria that resides in the colon, occasionally resulting in serious infection. Our goal is to identify the role of C. difficile isolation in patients with IBD. At the University of Chicago IBD Center, subjects were recruited and completed an enrollment questionnaire along with a rectal swab to test for C. difficile by bacterial culture. Six-months after enrollment, a final questionnaire was completed. Clinical symptoms were defined using validated instruments. Logistic regression analysis was preformed to identify the role of C. difficile carriage on clinical outcomes. The study included 133 subjects (68.4% with Crohn's disease; age 41.5 + 15.9 years), 70 (52.6%) of whom were male and 114 (85.7%) were white. Eighty-one (60.9%) were clinically asymptomatic at enrollment. Of the 133 subjects, 83 (62.4%) completed the final questionnaire, 55 (66.3%) of whom were asymptomatic. Seven patients developed worsening clinical symptoms over the study period. C. difficile at baseline was protective of a change in clinical symptoms (OR: 0.15, 95% CI 0.004-0.25). Patients with C. difficile in IBD are less likely to have a change in clinical symptoms over time.


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Apr 28th, 11:05 AM Apr 28th, 11:30 AM

What is the Role of Clostridium difficile Carriage in Inflammatory Bowel Disease

A-121

Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is an autoimmune condition that results in inflammation of the intestines. Clostridium difficile is a bacteria that resides in the colon, occasionally resulting in serious infection. Our goal is to identify the role of C. difficile isolation in patients with IBD. At the University of Chicago IBD Center, subjects were recruited and completed an enrollment questionnaire along with a rectal swab to test for C. difficile by bacterial culture. Six-months after enrollment, a final questionnaire was completed. Clinical symptoms were defined using validated instruments. Logistic regression analysis was preformed to identify the role of C. difficile carriage on clinical outcomes. The study included 133 subjects (68.4% with Crohn's disease; age 41.5 + 15.9 years), 70 (52.6%) of whom were male and 114 (85.7%) were white. Eighty-one (60.9%) were clinically asymptomatic at enrollment. Of the 133 subjects, 83 (62.4%) completed the final questionnaire, 55 (66.3%) of whom were asymptomatic. Seven patients developed worsening clinical symptoms over the study period. C. difficile at baseline was protective of a change in clinical symptoms (OR: 0.15, 95% CI 0.004-0.25). Patients with C. difficile in IBD are less likely to have a change in clinical symptoms over time.