Event Title

Better Understanding the Anatomical Changes of Spiny Projection Neurons in Parkinson's Disease Through 3D Reconstruction

Session Number

Q01

Advisor(s)

Savio Chan, Northwestern University
Harry Xenias, Northwestern University

Location

A-133

Start Date

28-4-2016 10:40 AM

End Date

28-4-2016 11:05 AM

Disciplines

Neuroscience and Neurobiology

Abstract

The Globus Pallidus External (GPe) receives input from the Striatum (Str) as well as projects back to its spiny projection neurons (SPN). This pallidostriatal pathway was historically difficult to study due to technological restrictions. Recent advances in transgenic technologies allowed for the creation of a new mouse line to be combined with optogenetics, a genetic technique which causes specific cell types to fire action potentials using light-activated channels. To better understand the connection and electrophysiological significance in the pallidostriatal pathway, the GPe neurons can be excited through shining light on them while recording the Str projection neurons. In a Parkinson's disease experimental mouse model, it was found that GPe-Str connections became stronger and GPe- SPN contacts increased, meaning that electrophysiological properties were altered. A 3D reconstruction of SPN neurons is being performed, revealing the location of GPe-SPN connections in an effort to better understand these anatomical changes and connections. This will allow for mathematical analysis to determine whether these connections are becoming more sparse or clustered. In addition, the data will be able to be correlated to the locations of proteins which transduce inputs from GPe to signals in the SPNs.


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Apr 28th, 10:40 AM Apr 28th, 11:05 AM

Better Understanding the Anatomical Changes of Spiny Projection Neurons in Parkinson's Disease Through 3D Reconstruction

A-133

The Globus Pallidus External (GPe) receives input from the Striatum (Str) as well as projects back to its spiny projection neurons (SPN). This pallidostriatal pathway was historically difficult to study due to technological restrictions. Recent advances in transgenic technologies allowed for the creation of a new mouse line to be combined with optogenetics, a genetic technique which causes specific cell types to fire action potentials using light-activated channels. To better understand the connection and electrophysiological significance in the pallidostriatal pathway, the GPe neurons can be excited through shining light on them while recording the Str projection neurons. In a Parkinson's disease experimental mouse model, it was found that GPe-Str connections became stronger and GPe- SPN contacts increased, meaning that electrophysiological properties were altered. A 3D reconstruction of SPN neurons is being performed, revealing the location of GPe-SPN connections in an effort to better understand these anatomical changes and connections. This will allow for mathematical analysis to determine whether these connections are becoming more sparse or clustered. In addition, the data will be able to be correlated to the locations of proteins which transduce inputs from GPe to signals in the SPNs.