Event Title

Characterization of Chlorella Algae Virus PVCV-1 in Western Suburban Freshwater Bodies

Session Number

C17

Advisor(s)

Crystal Randall, Illinois Mathematics and Science Academy

Location

A-113

Start Date

28-4-2016 1:35 PM

End Date

28-4-2016 2:00 PM

Disciplines

Biology

Abstract

The eukaryotic green algae strain Chlorella NC64A and its corresponding Chlorella virus PBCV-1 are both commonly found in North American freshwater bodies. In this investigation, we tested the abundance of the PBCV-1 virus within the freshwater lake "No-Pond" located behind IMSA's campus. For this investigation, we collected water from "No-Pond" and filtered it so that only virus particles would remain. Afterwards, we grew subcultures of our original NC64A algae strain on slants of Modified Bold's Basal Medium under a UV light. After successful growth in the slants, we moved the algae to liquid cultures. Finally, by combining our filtered pond water with the algae and liquid media, we performed plaque assays to assess the abundance of the virus. Preliminary results suggest that the virus may not be very abundant within "No-Pond"; however, more plaque assays will be done in the future to confirm this. Final results will be presented. The study of eukaryotic green algae and their viruses is becoming increasingly important as algae is a strong candidate for a future resource of food and biofuel.


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Apr 28th, 1:35 PM Apr 28th, 2:00 PM

Characterization of Chlorella Algae Virus PVCV-1 in Western Suburban Freshwater Bodies

A-113

The eukaryotic green algae strain Chlorella NC64A and its corresponding Chlorella virus PBCV-1 are both commonly found in North American freshwater bodies. In this investigation, we tested the abundance of the PBCV-1 virus within the freshwater lake "No-Pond" located behind IMSA's campus. For this investigation, we collected water from "No-Pond" and filtered it so that only virus particles would remain. Afterwards, we grew subcultures of our original NC64A algae strain on slants of Modified Bold's Basal Medium under a UV light. After successful growth in the slants, we moved the algae to liquid cultures. Finally, by combining our filtered pond water with the algae and liquid media, we performed plaque assays to assess the abundance of the virus. Preliminary results suggest that the virus may not be very abundant within "No-Pond"; however, more plaque assays will be done in the future to confirm this. Final results will be presented. The study of eukaryotic green algae and their viruses is becoming increasingly important as algae is a strong candidate for a future resource of food and biofuel.