Session Number

C997

Advisor(s)

Eugene Chang, University of Chicago
Ketrija Touw, University of Chicago

Location

B-206 Lecture Hall

Start Date

28-4-2016 12:45 PM

End Date

28-4-2016 1:10 PM

Disciplines

Biology

Abstract

Antibiotics are widely used to treat infectious diseases caused by pathogenic bacteria in many disease states. While eliminating pathogens, antibiotics also affect gut commensal bacteria composition, leading to long-lasting gastrointestinal (GI) symptoms associated with GI motility problems. In this study, the mechanism by which the broad-spectrum antibiotic cefoperazone, gram-positive specific antibiotic vancomycin, and gram-negative specific antibiotic neomycin affect GI motility and gut microbial composition was examined. To assess alterations in the host after antibiotic treatment, whole gut transit time was measured by gavaging and tracing charcoal dye. Significantly delayed GI transit time in antibiotic-treated mice was observed, especially in the cefoperazone test group. Bacterial community structure in cecal contents was analyzed by 16S rRNA analysis. Results showed a significant decrease in Bacteroidetes and increase in Firmicutes in cefoperazone-treated and neomycin-treated mice. There was also a significant increase in Proteobacteria in vancomycin-treated mice. Using gas chromatography–mass spectrometry, short chain fatty acids levels were measured to be lower in antibiotic-treated mice. Overall, these results suggest that antibiotic use leads to delayed GI transit time possibly due to alterations in microbial community and metabolic profile. These findings could be beneficial for alleviating symptoms with antibiotic usage.

Included in

Biology Commons

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Apr 28th, 12:45 PM Apr 28th, 1:10 PM

The Effect of Antibiotics on Gastrointestinal Motility and Gut Microbiota

B-206 Lecture Hall

Antibiotics are widely used to treat infectious diseases caused by pathogenic bacteria in many disease states. While eliminating pathogens, antibiotics also affect gut commensal bacteria composition, leading to long-lasting gastrointestinal (GI) symptoms associated with GI motility problems. In this study, the mechanism by which the broad-spectrum antibiotic cefoperazone, gram-positive specific antibiotic vancomycin, and gram-negative specific antibiotic neomycin affect GI motility and gut microbial composition was examined. To assess alterations in the host after antibiotic treatment, whole gut transit time was measured by gavaging and tracing charcoal dye. Significantly delayed GI transit time in antibiotic-treated mice was observed, especially in the cefoperazone test group. Bacterial community structure in cecal contents was analyzed by 16S rRNA analysis. Results showed a significant decrease in Bacteroidetes and increase in Firmicutes in cefoperazone-treated and neomycin-treated mice. There was also a significant increase in Proteobacteria in vancomycin-treated mice. Using gas chromatography–mass spectrometry, short chain fatty acids levels were measured to be lower in antibiotic-treated mice. Overall, these results suggest that antibiotic use leads to delayed GI transit time possibly due to alterations in microbial community and metabolic profile. These findings could be beneficial for alleviating symptoms with antibiotic usage.

 

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