Event Title

An Electrocorticographic Study of Embodied Cognition in the Human Brain

Session Number

Q26

Advisor(s)

V. Leo Towle, University of Chicago

Location

A-133

Start Date

28-4-2016 2:00 PM

End Date

28-4-2016 2:25 PM

Disciplines

Neuroscience and Neurobiology

Abstract

Gamma activation in the motor cortex is often observed during language processing tasks in the human brain. Conventional neurology considers this phenomenon to be irrelevant in language comprehension and processing. In 2010, however, Pulvermüller theorized that gamma activity in the motor cortex during the processing of language nouns and verbs. In order to test this, epilepsy patients were tested using a semantic-based language processing task to collect wavelengths from electrodes implanted on the brain’s surface, and an evoked potentials test in order to determine which electrodes were in contact with the motor cortex. Together, these data show whether electrodes over the motor cortex were activated during the processing of movement-related words. The results showed that the motor and language circuits are independent of each other.


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Apr 28th, 2:00 PM Apr 28th, 2:25 PM

An Electrocorticographic Study of Embodied Cognition in the Human Brain

A-133

Gamma activation in the motor cortex is often observed during language processing tasks in the human brain. Conventional neurology considers this phenomenon to be irrelevant in language comprehension and processing. In 2010, however, Pulvermüller theorized that gamma activity in the motor cortex during the processing of language nouns and verbs. In order to test this, epilepsy patients were tested using a semantic-based language processing task to collect wavelengths from electrodes implanted on the brain’s surface, and an evoked potentials test in order to determine which electrodes were in contact with the motor cortex. Together, these data show whether electrodes over the motor cortex were activated during the processing of movement-related words. The results showed that the motor and language circuits are independent of each other.