Event Title

The Effect of Social Anxiety on Acute Responses to the Drug MDMA (Ecstasy

Session Number

S02

Advisor(s)

Kasey Van Hedger, University of Chicago
Harriet de Wit, University of Chicago

Location

A-131

Start Date

28-4-2016 2:00 PM

End Date

28-4-2016 2:25 PM

Disciplines

Psychology

Abstract

MDMA, commonly known as ecstasy, is a recreational drug that has been shown to increase sociability in its users. Acute prosocial and drug effects are explored in relation to individual differences in social and general anxiety. A three session, double-blind, within subject study design was deployed in which 60 subjects received placebo, a low dose of MDMA, and a high dose of MDMA. At several time points after administration, participants self-reported data of their mood and any drug effects they felt. These responses were compared to the participants’ trait levels of social closeness and stress reaction. Based on prior research and a graph of drug effects over time (0-240 minutes after drug administration), 120 minutes was determined to be the time of peak drug effects. Preliminary results show that individuals’ social closeness trait is not significantly correlated with state anxiety at 120 minutes for any dose. However, individuals’ stress reaction trait is negatively significantly correlated with how much participants like the effects of MDMA at 120 minutes for low and high dose. Individual’s trait anxiety is likely to affect the acute responses of MDMA. In psychotherapy, MDMA could have different effects on different people because of their different traits.


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Apr 28th, 2:00 PM Apr 28th, 2:25 PM

The Effect of Social Anxiety on Acute Responses to the Drug MDMA (Ecstasy

A-131

MDMA, commonly known as ecstasy, is a recreational drug that has been shown to increase sociability in its users. Acute prosocial and drug effects are explored in relation to individual differences in social and general anxiety. A three session, double-blind, within subject study design was deployed in which 60 subjects received placebo, a low dose of MDMA, and a high dose of MDMA. At several time points after administration, participants self-reported data of their mood and any drug effects they felt. These responses were compared to the participants’ trait levels of social closeness and stress reaction. Based on prior research and a graph of drug effects over time (0-240 minutes after drug administration), 120 minutes was determined to be the time of peak drug effects. Preliminary results show that individuals’ social closeness trait is not significantly correlated with state anxiety at 120 minutes for any dose. However, individuals’ stress reaction trait is negatively significantly correlated with how much participants like the effects of MDMA at 120 minutes for low and high dose. Individual’s trait anxiety is likely to affect the acute responses of MDMA. In psychotherapy, MDMA could have different effects on different people because of their different traits.