Event Title

Determining the Effectiveness of Low-Dose Computerized Tomography Screenings in Detecting Early Stage Lung Cancer

Session Number

P01

Advisor(s)

Rachel Logan, Riverside Healthcare Center

Location

B-108

Start Date

28-4-2016 1:10 PM

End Date

28-4-2016 1:35 PM

Disciplines

Medicine and Health Sciences

Abstract

Historically, most lung cancers were detected at late stages (30% are stage III and 40% are stage IV). Trials were conducted testing the viability of low-dose computed tomography (LDCT) screening for nodule detection. The US Preventive Services Task Force identified guidelines for advising LDCT screening based on the National Lung Screening Trial. It was determined that those with a 30 pack-year smoking history who are current smokers or who have quit within 15 years, and are between 55 and 74 years old are at highest risk for lung cancer and therefore benefit most from LDCT screening. Furthermore, a 20% reduction in lung cancer mortality has been reported when properly implementing LDCT screening guidelines. Unfortunately, patients were not often receiving treatment within the recommended 14 week window. Delays were most commonly seen in obtaining a CT scan or awaiting biopsy or surgery. Therefore, it is important to establish efficient methods to deliver CT scans, biopsies and surgeries to patients. A retrospective study was performed to identify the effectiveness of a comprehensive lung nodule committee in a community setting for determining early stage lung cancers and ensuring timeliness of care between suspicion and treatment.


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Apr 28th, 1:10 PM Apr 28th, 1:35 PM

Determining the Effectiveness of Low-Dose Computerized Tomography Screenings in Detecting Early Stage Lung Cancer

B-108

Historically, most lung cancers were detected at late stages (30% are stage III and 40% are stage IV). Trials were conducted testing the viability of low-dose computed tomography (LDCT) screening for nodule detection. The US Preventive Services Task Force identified guidelines for advising LDCT screening based on the National Lung Screening Trial. It was determined that those with a 30 pack-year smoking history who are current smokers or who have quit within 15 years, and are between 55 and 74 years old are at highest risk for lung cancer and therefore benefit most from LDCT screening. Furthermore, a 20% reduction in lung cancer mortality has been reported when properly implementing LDCT screening guidelines. Unfortunately, patients were not often receiving treatment within the recommended 14 week window. Delays were most commonly seen in obtaining a CT scan or awaiting biopsy or surgery. Therefore, it is important to establish efficient methods to deliver CT scans, biopsies and surgeries to patients. A retrospective study was performed to identify the effectiveness of a comprehensive lung nodule committee in a community setting for determining early stage lung cancers and ensuring timeliness of care between suspicion and treatment.