Event Title

Effect of Outside Stimuli During Sleep Stages

Session Number

Q04

Advisor(s)

Moran Cerf, Northwestern University

Location

B-115

Start Date

28-4-2016 1:35 PM

End Date

28-4-2016 2:00 PM

Disciplines

Neuroscience and Neurobiology

Abstract

Previous studies has shown that stimuli during certain sleep stages could potentially affect decision making skills in people. Our goal was to find what specific factors would affect our subjects during a sleeping state. To do so, we used a meditation device called MUSE headband to track the brain activity while subjects were asleep. The MUSE headband contains 7 brain sensors and has an application that translate the signals it receives into raw electroencephalographic (EEG) data. This headband and application provides real time brain rhythm while subjects were asleep. We then tracked their different sleep stages, and located the slow wave sleep stage and enacted various types of smelling stimuli such as different foods and fragrance to determine whether outside stimuli during sleep can affect future decisions.The main indicators were the sleep spindles and K-complexes shown in the EEG graphs. Our results showed that in the case of smelling stimuli, there was not a correlation


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Apr 28th, 1:35 PM Apr 28th, 2:00 PM

Effect of Outside Stimuli During Sleep Stages

B-115

Previous studies has shown that stimuli during certain sleep stages could potentially affect decision making skills in people. Our goal was to find what specific factors would affect our subjects during a sleeping state. To do so, we used a meditation device called MUSE headband to track the brain activity while subjects were asleep. The MUSE headband contains 7 brain sensors and has an application that translate the signals it receives into raw electroencephalographic (EEG) data. This headband and application provides real time brain rhythm while subjects were asleep. We then tracked their different sleep stages, and located the slow wave sleep stage and enacted various types of smelling stimuli such as different foods and fragrance to determine whether outside stimuli during sleep can affect future decisions.The main indicators were the sleep spindles and K-complexes shown in the EEG graphs. Our results showed that in the case of smelling stimuli, there was not a correlation