Event Title

Manganese and Zinc Alzheimer’s Disease Diagnostic Probe

Session Number

Q05

Advisor(s)

William Klein, Northwestern University
Kirsten Viola, Northwestern University

Location

A-123

Start Date

28-4-2016 12:45 PM

End Date

28-4-2016 1:10 PM

Disciplines

Neuroscience and Neurobiology

Abstract

A new iron oxide magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) probe has been developed to diagnose Alzheimer’s disease (AD) earlier. It does this by using a NU4 antibody which binds to oligomers in the brain. Currently, many AD probes use antibodies that target amyloid plaques. However, there is evidence that oligomers occur earlier, making them a better target for diagnosis. My investigation was on a manganese and zinc probe, a modified version of this iron oxide probe. By adding both manganese and zinc, the magnetization of the probe is increased. In theory, an increase in magnetization will result in images that are much darker in areas where there is AD pathology. These images will help radiologists interpret images and diagnose AD patients with increased accuracy. However, before these probes can be tested with MRI, preliminary tests to determine its efficacy as a probe have to be conducted. Immunohistochemistry and immunocytochemistry were conducted on both the iron oxide and manganese zinc probes. The results were compared to determine the binding efficacy of the manganese zinc probe and whether or not adding these metals affected immunoreactivity. A toxicity assay was also conducted to determine if this probe is safe for human-use.


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Apr 28th, 12:45 PM Apr 28th, 1:10 PM

Manganese and Zinc Alzheimer’s Disease Diagnostic Probe

A-123

A new iron oxide magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) probe has been developed to diagnose Alzheimer’s disease (AD) earlier. It does this by using a NU4 antibody which binds to oligomers in the brain. Currently, many AD probes use antibodies that target amyloid plaques. However, there is evidence that oligomers occur earlier, making them a better target for diagnosis. My investigation was on a manganese and zinc probe, a modified version of this iron oxide probe. By adding both manganese and zinc, the magnetization of the probe is increased. In theory, an increase in magnetization will result in images that are much darker in areas where there is AD pathology. These images will help radiologists interpret images and diagnose AD patients with increased accuracy. However, before these probes can be tested with MRI, preliminary tests to determine its efficacy as a probe have to be conducted. Immunohistochemistry and immunocytochemistry were conducted on both the iron oxide and manganese zinc probes. The results were compared to determine the binding efficacy of the manganese zinc probe and whether or not adding these metals affected immunoreactivity. A toxicity assay was also conducted to determine if this probe is safe for human-use.