Event Title

Morphological Properties of Diseased Astrocytes in the Hippocampus and Globus Pallidus

Session Number

Q06

Advisor(s)

Savio Chan, Northwestern University

Location

A-133

Start Date

28-4-2016 12:45 PM

End Date

28-4-2016 1:10 PM

Disciplines

Neuroscience and Neurobiology

Abstract

Little is known about the effects of Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s disease on the astrocytes in the hippocampal and basal ganglian regions of the brain. In order to understand how astrocytes are affected in these parts of a diseased brain, images of astrocytes in diseased and non-diseased mouse brains were collected. Preliminary results, found using a sholl analysis, have shown that there is no significant morphological difference between astrocytes found in mice with the familial form of Alzheimer’s disease and those found in control mice brains. In addition, other preliminary results show that there will be no significant morphological difference between the astrocytes found in mice with a familial form of Parkinson’s and astrocytes in control mice brains. However, these results have yet to be confirmed, as the number of sample images in both experimental groups has grown. As this investigation continues, the results of this investigation could potentially identify the specificities of what neurological diseases do to astrocytes and redirect medicinal research.


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Apr 28th, 12:45 PM Apr 28th, 1:10 PM

Morphological Properties of Diseased Astrocytes in the Hippocampus and Globus Pallidus

A-133

Little is known about the effects of Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s disease on the astrocytes in the hippocampal and basal ganglian regions of the brain. In order to understand how astrocytes are affected in these parts of a diseased brain, images of astrocytes in diseased and non-diseased mouse brains were collected. Preliminary results, found using a sholl analysis, have shown that there is no significant morphological difference between astrocytes found in mice with the familial form of Alzheimer’s disease and those found in control mice brains. In addition, other preliminary results show that there will be no significant morphological difference between the astrocytes found in mice with a familial form of Parkinson’s and astrocytes in control mice brains. However, these results have yet to be confirmed, as the number of sample images in both experimental groups has grown. As this investigation continues, the results of this investigation could potentially identify the specificities of what neurological diseases do to astrocytes and redirect medicinal research.