Event Title

Understanding the Chicken Embryo Model for Alzheimer’s Disease-Related Research

Session Number

Q07

Advisor(s)

William Klein, Northwestern University
Kirsten Viola, Northwestern University

Location

A-123

Start Date

28-4-2016 1:10 PM

End Date

28-4-2016 1:35 PM

Disciplines

Neuroscience and Neurobiology

Abstract

One major hallmark of Alzheimer’s disease (AD) is the accumulation of toxic amyloid-β oligomers (AβOs), but scientists do not fully understand why this increase occurs. Most researchers currently use the transgenic mice model to understand the AD pathways, but some studies have shown that the chicken embryo may be a more suitable and less costly alternative because chickens and humans have identical Aβ peptides. The purpose of our study was to gather more information on this embryonic model. First, we observed the relationship between AβOs and APP in the brain tissues of embryos that have been fertilized for 6-14 days (E6-E14). After normalizing the brain extracts between all samples, we obtained the relative concentrations between APP and AβOs at each stage of development tested and determined that there is a statistically significant correlation between APP and AβOs (p < 0.01). In addition, we chose to test the abilities of chicken embryo cultures for drug testing research. Hotspot assays were conducted on 3-dayold E8 cell cultures to determine if synthetic AβOs will bind to the avian neurons. Because oligomers did not bind to the neurons, we concluded that we cannot perform drug testing research on cell cultures of the model


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Apr 28th, 1:10 PM Apr 28th, 1:35 PM

Understanding the Chicken Embryo Model for Alzheimer’s Disease-Related Research

A-123

One major hallmark of Alzheimer’s disease (AD) is the accumulation of toxic amyloid-β oligomers (AβOs), but scientists do not fully understand why this increase occurs. Most researchers currently use the transgenic mice model to understand the AD pathways, but some studies have shown that the chicken embryo may be a more suitable and less costly alternative because chickens and humans have identical Aβ peptides. The purpose of our study was to gather more information on this embryonic model. First, we observed the relationship between AβOs and APP in the brain tissues of embryos that have been fertilized for 6-14 days (E6-E14). After normalizing the brain extracts between all samples, we obtained the relative concentrations between APP and AβOs at each stage of development tested and determined that there is a statistically significant correlation between APP and AβOs (p < 0.01). In addition, we chose to test the abilities of chicken embryo cultures for drug testing research. Hotspot assays were conducted on 3-dayold E8 cell cultures to determine if synthetic AβOs will bind to the avian neurons. Because oligomers did not bind to the neurons, we concluded that we cannot perform drug testing research on cell cultures of the model