Event Title

Ion Channels and Action Potentials in Primary Vestibular Neurons: Impact of Damage and Regeneration in the Vestibular Epithelium

Session Number

Q16

Advisor(s)

Ruth Anne Eatock, University of Chicago
Antonia Gonzalez Garrido, University of Chicago

Location

B-116

Start Date

28-4-2016 1:10 PM

End Date

28-4-2016 1:35 PM

Disciplines

Neuroscience and Neurobiology

Abstract

Vestibular receptors (hair cells) transduce head motions and transmit their signals to primary afferent neurons, but it is not known how death, and regeneration of the hair cells affects the signals of afferent neurons. To answer these questions, we compared the electrical signals of afferent neurons from control mice and mice treated with a toxin that selectively kills hair cells. We isolated the vestibular ganglion, comprising cell bodies of primary afferent neurons, dissociated the tissue in culture medium, incubated them overnight, and viewed them on a microscope. Using the patch-clamp technique, we recorded the fast sodium (Na+) current (I) and the voltage responses (V) of the neurons. To analyze the recordings, we calculate the conductance (G), and fit G(V) relations with the Boltzmann equation and compare the control against the toxin-treated data. Preliminary results suggest that Na+ currents are smaller in regenerated hair cells, as seen during development. We will obtain more data to test this hypothesis, and whether this change affects action potentials. This study will determine how the death and regeneration of hair cells affects the afferent neurons, which is relevant to treatment options for damaged inner ears.


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Apr 28th, 1:10 PM Apr 28th, 1:35 PM

Ion Channels and Action Potentials in Primary Vestibular Neurons: Impact of Damage and Regeneration in the Vestibular Epithelium

B-116

Vestibular receptors (hair cells) transduce head motions and transmit their signals to primary afferent neurons, but it is not known how death, and regeneration of the hair cells affects the signals of afferent neurons. To answer these questions, we compared the electrical signals of afferent neurons from control mice and mice treated with a toxin that selectively kills hair cells. We isolated the vestibular ganglion, comprising cell bodies of primary afferent neurons, dissociated the tissue in culture medium, incubated them overnight, and viewed them on a microscope. Using the patch-clamp technique, we recorded the fast sodium (Na+) current (I) and the voltage responses (V) of the neurons. To analyze the recordings, we calculate the conductance (G), and fit G(V) relations with the Boltzmann equation and compare the control against the toxin-treated data. Preliminary results suggest that Na+ currents are smaller in regenerated hair cells, as seen during development. We will obtain more data to test this hypothesis, and whether this change affects action potentials. This study will determine how the death and regeneration of hair cells affects the afferent neurons, which is relevant to treatment options for damaged inner ears.