Event Title

Session 1G: The Effect of MBEH and 4-TBP on Nevomelanocyte Viability and Pigmentation

Session Number

Session 1G : 3rd Presentation

Advisor(s)

Caroline Le Poole, Loyola University

Location

Room A117

Start Date

28-4-2017 8:30 AM

End Date

28-4-2017 9:45 AM

Abstract

Congenital nevi are pigmented moles on the skin that can develop into melanoma, a malignant type of skin cancer. Minimally invasive treatment is needed to replace surgery in the case of pervasive congenital nevi. It was proposed that tyrosine analogs can be used to treat nevi and prevent cancer formation. Specifically, monobenzyl ether of hydroquinone (MBEH) has been used to treat vitiligo, an autoimmune skin disease that produces depigmentation, by inducing melanocyte necrosis, and 4- tertiary butyl phenol (4-TBP) has been demonstrated to produce apoptosis of melanocytes in cytotoxicity studies. These analogs are proposed to have a similar effect on nevomelanocytes but have not yet been tested. This project aims to test their effectiveness in vitro and ex vivo so that future treatment may be improved.

Comments

Additional team members: Steven Henning and Emilia Dellacecca

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Apr 28th, 8:30 AM Apr 28th, 9:45 AM

Session 1G: The Effect of MBEH and 4-TBP on Nevomelanocyte Viability and Pigmentation

Room A117

Congenital nevi are pigmented moles on the skin that can develop into melanoma, a malignant type of skin cancer. Minimally invasive treatment is needed to replace surgery in the case of pervasive congenital nevi. It was proposed that tyrosine analogs can be used to treat nevi and prevent cancer formation. Specifically, monobenzyl ether of hydroquinone (MBEH) has been used to treat vitiligo, an autoimmune skin disease that produces depigmentation, by inducing melanocyte necrosis, and 4- tertiary butyl phenol (4-TBP) has been demonstrated to produce apoptosis of melanocytes in cytotoxicity studies. These analogs are proposed to have a similar effect on nevomelanocytes but have not yet been tested. This project aims to test their effectiveness in vitro and ex vivo so that future treatment may be improved.