Event Title

Session 2H: Optimization of Ceramic Water Filters for the Developing World

Session Number

Session 2H: 1st Presentation

Advisor(s)

Mark Carlson, Illinois mathematics and Science Academy

Location

Room B101

Start Date

28-4-2017 10:00 AM

End Date

28-4-2017 11:15 AM

Abstract

The goal of this project is to create a porous ceramic water filter for families in the developing world in need of sanitary water. Estimates put this number at nearly a billion people. Our targets include a bacterial kill rate of 99%, a flow rate of 2 L/hr, and an annualized user cost of $20. Filter composition was varied in terms of the volume ratio of clay to sawdust, ranging from 1:1 to 9:13. After firing they were painted with a silver nanoparticle solution. Filters 0.10 to 0.15 m in diameter and 0.005 to 0.015 m thick were attached to 4” PVC pipe which supported solutions of Escherichia coli, initially 0.25 to 0.50 m in height. Preliminary results show that the filter with the highest flow that maintains the target kill rate has a 9:11 clay to sawdust ratio. A 0.15 m diameter disc 0.01 m thick of that composition yielded a kill rate better than 99% with a flow rate of 2.8 L/hr when the initial fluid height was 0.35 m. Further experimentation will aim to replicate the preliminary results. Additionally, we are looking to make the process more efficient by creating a press for the filters. While the retail material costs sum to only half of our budgeted amount, we wish to lower them further to allow for labor and distribution expenses in our target value.

Comments

Additional team members: Manny Hernandez (Emeritus faculty, NIU)

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Apr 28th, 10:00 AM Apr 28th, 11:15 AM

Session 2H: Optimization of Ceramic Water Filters for the Developing World

Room B101

The goal of this project is to create a porous ceramic water filter for families in the developing world in need of sanitary water. Estimates put this number at nearly a billion people. Our targets include a bacterial kill rate of 99%, a flow rate of 2 L/hr, and an annualized user cost of $20. Filter composition was varied in terms of the volume ratio of clay to sawdust, ranging from 1:1 to 9:13. After firing they were painted with a silver nanoparticle solution. Filters 0.10 to 0.15 m in diameter and 0.005 to 0.015 m thick were attached to 4” PVC pipe which supported solutions of Escherichia coli, initially 0.25 to 0.50 m in height. Preliminary results show that the filter with the highest flow that maintains the target kill rate has a 9:11 clay to sawdust ratio. A 0.15 m diameter disc 0.01 m thick of that composition yielded a kill rate better than 99% with a flow rate of 2.8 L/hr when the initial fluid height was 0.35 m. Further experimentation will aim to replicate the preliminary results. Additionally, we are looking to make the process more efficient by creating a press for the filters. While the retail material costs sum to only half of our budgeted amount, we wish to lower them further to allow for labor and distribution expenses in our target value.