Event Title

Session 2I: Search for Supersymmetry Using Top Quark Signatures in the CMS Experiment at the LHC and at Possible Future Colliders

Session Number

Session2I: 1st Presentation

Advisor(s)

Richard Cavanaugh, Fermilab and University of Illinois at Chicago

Location

Room B108

Start Date

28-4-2017 10:00 AM

End Date

28-4-2017 11:15 AM

Abstract

The Compact Muon Solenoid (CMS) Experiment at the CERN Large Hadron Collider (LHC) is a particle detector that is being used to search for possible new physics, such as Supersymmetry and Dark Matter. The top quark is one of the most important particles in the search for Supersymmetry, and it is highly sought after at CMS due to its large mass and strong interactions with Higgs bosons. The supersymmetric partner to the top quark, the top squark, is predicted to have a mass of at least 1 TeV. In this research we will analyze real and simulated collision data from the CMS Experiment to search for hypothetical top squark production using algorithms designed to identify top quarks from the jets of particles they decay to and algorithms to eliminate background signatures, potentially revealing new physics. The search algorithms developed at the LHC will also be evaluated using simulations involving a possible future Very High Energy Large Hadron Collider, which would collide particles with 10 times more energy than the present day LHC.

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Apr 28th, 10:00 AM Apr 28th, 11:15 AM

Session 2I: Search for Supersymmetry Using Top Quark Signatures in the CMS Experiment at the LHC and at Possible Future Colliders

Room B108

The Compact Muon Solenoid (CMS) Experiment at the CERN Large Hadron Collider (LHC) is a particle detector that is being used to search for possible new physics, such as Supersymmetry and Dark Matter. The top quark is one of the most important particles in the search for Supersymmetry, and it is highly sought after at CMS due to its large mass and strong interactions with Higgs bosons. The supersymmetric partner to the top quark, the top squark, is predicted to have a mass of at least 1 TeV. In this research we will analyze real and simulated collision data from the CMS Experiment to search for hypothetical top squark production using algorithms designed to identify top quarks from the jets of particles they decay to and algorithms to eliminate background signatures, potentially revealing new physics. The search algorithms developed at the LHC will also be evaluated using simulations involving a possible future Very High Energy Large Hadron Collider, which would collide particles with 10 times more energy than the present day LHC.