Event Title

Session 2C: Phenological Differences between Invasive Grasses, Shrubs, and Trees in Comparison to Native Species

Session Number

Session 2C: 1st Presentation

Advisor(s)

Christine Rollinson, Morton Arboretum

Location

Room A151

Start Date

28-4-2017 10:00 AM

End Date

28-4-2017 11:15 AM

Abstract

Invasive species plaguing the United States threaten native species and biodiversity by damaging native habitats. In Illinois, invasives of concern include common buckthorn, garlic mustard, multiflora rose, leafy spurge, and Japanese honeysuckle. Plant phenology is the study of seasonal occurrences in plants, such as the timing of bud bursts or flowers blooming. Previous studies have shown that invasive plants tend to grow for longer periods of time than native plants, and we are further exploring how a species’ functional role in the ecosystem can affect this difference. National Phenology Network data and data collected at the Morton Arboretum will be used to compare invasive and native phenology for several plant functional types (e.g. forbs, shrubs, and trees). Different functional types fill different ecological niches, so this will allow for an improved understanding of the roles invasive species play and how we can better manage them.

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Apr 28th, 10:00 AM Apr 28th, 11:15 AM

Session 2C: Phenological Differences between Invasive Grasses, Shrubs, and Trees in Comparison to Native Species

Room A151

Invasive species plaguing the United States threaten native species and biodiversity by damaging native habitats. In Illinois, invasives of concern include common buckthorn, garlic mustard, multiflora rose, leafy spurge, and Japanese honeysuckle. Plant phenology is the study of seasonal occurrences in plants, such as the timing of bud bursts or flowers blooming. Previous studies have shown that invasive plants tend to grow for longer periods of time than native plants, and we are further exploring how a species’ functional role in the ecosystem can affect this difference. National Phenology Network data and data collected at the Morton Arboretum will be used to compare invasive and native phenology for several plant functional types (e.g. forbs, shrubs, and trees). Different functional types fill different ecological niches, so this will allow for an improved understanding of the roles invasive species play and how we can better manage them.