Event Title

Session 2C: Using UAS to Collect and Identify Pollen and Dispersal Patterns

Session Number

Session 2C: 2nd Presentation

Advisor(s)

Chuck Cannon, Morton Arboretum

Location

Room A151

Start Date

28-4-2017 10:00 AM

End Date

28-4-2017 11:15 AM

Abstract

To better understand the dispersal patterns of airborne pollen, of which research and information is scarce, we want to design an unmanned aircraft system (UAS) for aerial sampling of pollen, spores and other particles to precisely determine the quantity and type of airborne objects at different altitudes and distances for a focal tree. Understanding dispersal patterns will help predict how plants will respond to climate change. Unmanned aircraft systems (UAS) have been utilized to conduct research involving airborne spore samples, which have been essential for pollen-related studies; however, most spore samples are taken two meters above the ground at the highest. Conventional spore traps are not adept in gathering data in the canopies of tree crops several meters above the ground. Unlike traditional methods, we will collect measurements of pollen at precise locations around the crown of the tree. We will build a device to attach to the drone that will either carry a slide mechanism that closes aerodynamically, open and close remotely, or close as it rotates. Collection methods include petroleum jelly, tape, fuchsin jelly, or paper. We want to use drones to collect and detect airborne pollen, such that the pollen can be identified and quantified.

Comments

Additional team members: Lane Scher and Dr. Chai-Shian Kua

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Apr 28th, 10:00 AM Apr 28th, 11:15 AM

Session 2C: Using UAS to Collect and Identify Pollen and Dispersal Patterns

Room A151

To better understand the dispersal patterns of airborne pollen, of which research and information is scarce, we want to design an unmanned aircraft system (UAS) for aerial sampling of pollen, spores and other particles to precisely determine the quantity and type of airborne objects at different altitudes and distances for a focal tree. Understanding dispersal patterns will help predict how plants will respond to climate change. Unmanned aircraft systems (UAS) have been utilized to conduct research involving airborne spore samples, which have been essential for pollen-related studies; however, most spore samples are taken two meters above the ground at the highest. Conventional spore traps are not adept in gathering data in the canopies of tree crops several meters above the ground. Unlike traditional methods, we will collect measurements of pollen at precise locations around the crown of the tree. We will build a device to attach to the drone that will either carry a slide mechanism that closes aerodynamically, open and close remotely, or close as it rotates. Collection methods include petroleum jelly, tape, fuchsin jelly, or paper. We want to use drones to collect and detect airborne pollen, such that the pollen can be identified and quantified.