Event Title

Session 3I: Searching for Primordial Black Holes and Other Exotic Dense Objects

Session Number

Session 3I: 3rd Presentation

Advisor(s)

James Annis, Fermilab

Location

Room B108

Start Date

28-4-2017 1:15 PM

End Date

28-4-2017 2:30 PM

Abstract

Dark matter is nonluminous material in the universe that is only known to interact through gravity, but may also interact via the weak or strong force. Although it is widely hypothesized that dark matter is weakly interacting massive particles, the recent detection of merging black holes by LIGO has brought forth the idea that dark matter takes the form of Primordial Black Holes (PBHs). If PBHs are found to exist in sufficient quantities, they might provide the additional mass necessary to explain the rotation speeds of galaxies and thus explain dark matter. The most convincing way to test arguments for or against dark matter candidates is through their direct detection. A methodology for detecting faint objects in the galactic halo is fortunately provided by gravitational microlensing. Microlensing occurs when a deflector mass like a star or black hole passes through the line of sight between an observer and a light source, forming an Einstein ring. In this investigation, we are focusing on searching for microlensing in Dark Energy Survey (DES) data to detect 10-100 Msolar black holes and place limits on their space density. This summer we will determine the microlensing detection efficiency of the DES data to check whether our current non-detections of microlensing from objects in this mass range are significant or not.

Comments

Additional team members: John DeMastri

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Apr 28th, 1:15 PM Apr 28th, 2:30 PM

Session 3I: Searching for Primordial Black Holes and Other Exotic Dense Objects

Room B108

Dark matter is nonluminous material in the universe that is only known to interact through gravity, but may also interact via the weak or strong force. Although it is widely hypothesized that dark matter is weakly interacting massive particles, the recent detection of merging black holes by LIGO has brought forth the idea that dark matter takes the form of Primordial Black Holes (PBHs). If PBHs are found to exist in sufficient quantities, they might provide the additional mass necessary to explain the rotation speeds of galaxies and thus explain dark matter. The most convincing way to test arguments for or against dark matter candidates is through their direct detection. A methodology for detecting faint objects in the galactic halo is fortunately provided by gravitational microlensing. Microlensing occurs when a deflector mass like a star or black hole passes through the line of sight between an observer and a light source, forming an Einstein ring. In this investigation, we are focusing on searching for microlensing in Dark Energy Survey (DES) data to detect 10-100 Msolar black holes and place limits on their space density. This summer we will determine the microlensing detection efficiency of the DES data to check whether our current non-detections of microlensing from objects in this mass range are significant or not.