Event Title

Session 1E: Optimizing a Silver Nanoparticle Ceramic Filter for Higher Flow

Session Number

Session 1E: 2nd Presentation

Advisor(s)

Dr. Mark Carlson, IMSA

Location

Room D103

Start Date

26-4-2018 9:40 AM

End Date

26-4-2018 10:25 AM

Abstract

We aim to create a porous ceramic water filter that would provide drinkable water for families in developing countries. The performance targets were a bacterial kill rate of 99% and a flow rate of 2 L/hr. Varying amounts of clay (and sometimes sand or grog), sawdust, and water were mixed and hand-pressed into disks (16 cm in diameter and 2 cm thick). After being fired in a kiln, they were painted with a variety of silver nanoparticles suspensions to augment their antibacterial potential. Currently, silver nanoparticles created in the presence of aloe show the best bacterial inhibition in liquid culture suspensions. For testing, the filters were sealed with silicone over a large hole in the bottom of a 5 gallon bucket. A solution of weakened Escherichia coli filled the bucket half full or more. From the filtrate, the flow rate was measured and the surviving bacteria plated and counted. Preliminary results show that a filter made from 138 g of sawdust and 462 g of clay mixed (slightly less clay than sawdust by volume) with approximately 550 mL of water yielded a flow rate of up to 3.2 L/hr with kill rates between 95-99.9%.

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Apr 26th, 9:40 AM Apr 26th, 10:25 AM

Session 1E: Optimizing a Silver Nanoparticle Ceramic Filter for Higher Flow

Room D103

We aim to create a porous ceramic water filter that would provide drinkable water for families in developing countries. The performance targets were a bacterial kill rate of 99% and a flow rate of 2 L/hr. Varying amounts of clay (and sometimes sand or grog), sawdust, and water were mixed and hand-pressed into disks (16 cm in diameter and 2 cm thick). After being fired in a kiln, they were painted with a variety of silver nanoparticles suspensions to augment their antibacterial potential. Currently, silver nanoparticles created in the presence of aloe show the best bacterial inhibition in liquid culture suspensions. For testing, the filters were sealed with silicone over a large hole in the bottom of a 5 gallon bucket. A solution of weakened Escherichia coli filled the bucket half full or more. From the filtrate, the flow rate was measured and the surviving bacteria plated and counted. Preliminary results show that a filter made from 138 g of sawdust and 462 g of clay mixed (slightly less clay than sawdust by volume) with approximately 550 mL of water yielded a flow rate of up to 3.2 L/hr with kill rates between 95-99.9%.