Event Title

Session 1L: The Effect of Temperature on Contact Angle Hysteresis

Session Number

Session 1L: 2nd Presentation

Advisor(s)

Dr. Sidney Nagel, University of Chicago

Location

Room A131

Start Date

26-4-2018 9:40 AM

End Date

26-4-2018 10:25 AM

Abstract

When a drop of liquid is set on a solid surface, it forms a contact angle with the surface described by Young’s equation with some variance, the magnitude of which is known as the contact angle hysteresis. Under certain situations, drying drops exhibit an exceptionally large contact angle hysteresis and while there are theoretical explanations for this, they remain unsatisfactory. We plan to study how varying the temperature of the liquid changes the contact angle hysteresis of drying drops. The large contact angle hysteresis is thought to be due to particle deposition on the edge due to varying evaporation rates over the drop so by changing the temperature, we can better understand the mechanism behind contact angle hysteresis. We will do this by using a high-zoom camera to take time-lapse photography of millimeter size liquid drops at varying temperatures. We will then use image processing in Mathematica to calculate the contact angle and thus calculate contact angle hysteresis

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Apr 26th, 9:40 AM Apr 26th, 10:25 AM

Session 1L: The Effect of Temperature on Contact Angle Hysteresis

Room A131

When a drop of liquid is set on a solid surface, it forms a contact angle with the surface described by Young’s equation with some variance, the magnitude of which is known as the contact angle hysteresis. Under certain situations, drying drops exhibit an exceptionally large contact angle hysteresis and while there are theoretical explanations for this, they remain unsatisfactory. We plan to study how varying the temperature of the liquid changes the contact angle hysteresis of drying drops. The large contact angle hysteresis is thought to be due to particle deposition on the edge due to varying evaporation rates over the drop so by changing the temperature, we can better understand the mechanism behind contact angle hysteresis. We will do this by using a high-zoom camera to take time-lapse photography of millimeter size liquid drops at varying temperatures. We will then use image processing in Mathematica to calculate the contact angle and thus calculate contact angle hysteresis