Event Title

Session 2I: Innervation Defects in Taste Buds due to the Loss of Ephrin-A Genes

Session Number

Session 2I: 1st Presentation

Advisor(s)

Dr. M. William Rochlin, Loyola University

Location

Room A119

Start Date

26-4-2018 10:35 AM

End Date

26-4-2018 11:20 AM

Abstract

The targeting of axons in the epithelium of the tongue requires a high level of precision, as taste axons innervate the taste bud, but avoid the surrounding epithelium, while a subset of somatosensory axons does the reverse. The cell-attached signaling molecules Eph and ephrins act as ligands and receptors for one another that trigger growth promotion or repulsion to help guide axons in the nervous system, but little is known about their role in the innervation of gustatory papillae. Ephrin-A’s and B’s are expressed in the lingual epithelium and repel taste and somatosensory neurites in vitro. I am studying the effects of the loss of ephrin-A in mice on taste bud size and innervation patterns. Preliminary data suggest that taste buds’ areas are smaller in Efna1, 3, 4 triple knockout (TKO) mice. Additionally, innervation breadth increases in embryonic tongues of TKO mice. These data are consistent with the possibility that an innervation defect due to the lack of ephrinA1, 3, and 4 decreases trophic support for the taste bud. Currently, I am further investigating this hypothesis.

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Apr 26th, 10:35 AM Apr 26th, 11:20 AM

Session 2I: Innervation Defects in Taste Buds due to the Loss of Ephrin-A Genes

Room A119

The targeting of axons in the epithelium of the tongue requires a high level of precision, as taste axons innervate the taste bud, but avoid the surrounding epithelium, while a subset of somatosensory axons does the reverse. The cell-attached signaling molecules Eph and ephrins act as ligands and receptors for one another that trigger growth promotion or repulsion to help guide axons in the nervous system, but little is known about their role in the innervation of gustatory papillae. Ephrin-A’s and B’s are expressed in the lingual epithelium and repel taste and somatosensory neurites in vitro. I am studying the effects of the loss of ephrin-A in mice on taste bud size and innervation patterns. Preliminary data suggest that taste buds’ areas are smaller in Efna1, 3, 4 triple knockout (TKO) mice. Additionally, innervation breadth increases in embryonic tongues of TKO mice. These data are consistent with the possibility that an innervation defect due to the lack of ephrinA1, 3, and 4 decreases trophic support for the taste bud. Currently, I am further investigating this hypothesis.