Event Title

Session 3E: High Resolution Tactile Sensors in Robotics

Session Number

Session 3E: 1st Presentation

Advisor(s)

Dr. Frank Harwath, North Central College

Location

Room D103

Start Date

26-4-2018 12:40 PM

End Date

26-4-2018 1:25 PM

Abstract

High resolution tactile sensors have many relevant applications in the field of biomedical engineering. Tactile sensing technology has already been applied to the Davinci robotic surgical assistant units, whichallow surgeons to perform minimally invasive surgeries remotely. Tactile sensors can potentially be applied to prosthetics research, giving the possibility of restoring cutaneous sense along with motor function. Current piezoelectric tactile sensors modeled off of skin are composed of multiple tactile sensor units imbedded in a flexible substrate. However, the resolutions of such sensor arrays are restricted by the quantity, dimensions, and spacing of its tactile sensing units. Thus, an optimization of manufacturing processes is necessary to increase resolution. However, as sensor quantity and density increases, the frequency of defects during the manufacturing process also increases while the resolution still remains limited. A solution to this issue is the creation of a tactile sensor that does not rely on a sensor array, and therefore, is not limited by resolution. This SIR focuses on research regarding the creation of a tactile sensor composed of a single resistive layer to circumvent issues with limited resolution.

Share

COinS
 
Apr 26th, 12:40 PM Apr 26th, 1:25 PM

Session 3E: High Resolution Tactile Sensors in Robotics

Room D103

High resolution tactile sensors have many relevant applications in the field of biomedical engineering. Tactile sensing technology has already been applied to the Davinci robotic surgical assistant units, whichallow surgeons to perform minimally invasive surgeries remotely. Tactile sensors can potentially be applied to prosthetics research, giving the possibility of restoring cutaneous sense along with motor function. Current piezoelectric tactile sensors modeled off of skin are composed of multiple tactile sensor units imbedded in a flexible substrate. However, the resolutions of such sensor arrays are restricted by the quantity, dimensions, and spacing of its tactile sensing units. Thus, an optimization of manufacturing processes is necessary to increase resolution. However, as sensor quantity and density increases, the frequency of defects during the manufacturing process also increases while the resolution still remains limited. A solution to this issue is the creation of a tactile sensor that does not rely on a sensor array, and therefore, is not limited by resolution. This SIR focuses on research regarding the creation of a tactile sensor composed of a single resistive layer to circumvent issues with limited resolution.