Event Title

Session 3J: Role of MLL (Mixed Lineage Leukemia) in tumorigenesis

Session Number

Session 3J: 2nd Presentation

Advisor(s)

Dr. Vandana Chinwalla, IMSA

Location

Room A123

Start Date

26-4-2018 12:40 PM

End Date

26-4-2018 1:25 PM

Abstract

The Mixed Lineage Leukemia (MLL) gene is a methyltransferase that aids in the chromatin modification of developmental genes in humans. The presence of the mutated MLL gene has been associated with the development of cancer. Previous research indicates that in every cancer associated with the mutated MLL gene, there is one normal functioning copy of the MLL gene. Our goal in this research is to see if knocking out the MLL gene function decreases tumorigenesis. We will use the CRISPR/Cas9 genome editing system. The MLL gRNA molecules have been designed and will be composed into the correct CRISPR/Cas9 vector. This construct will be used to transfect a variety of human cell lines, starting with lung cancer cells. After the transfection, we will use the microscope to see how many cells are alive. The cells will be analyzed for apoptotic death using an apoptosis assay. This is because based on prior research, knocking out the MLL gene should induce apoptosis. We confirm the knocking out of MLL through genome sequencing. Based on the analysis, we want to see if there is greater apoptotic death in the cells that were treated with the vector in comparison with the control cells. We hope to use this data/research as a way of developing a MLL-targeted therapy for leukemia and other solid cancers.

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Apr 26th, 12:40 PM Apr 26th, 1:25 PM

Session 3J: Role of MLL (Mixed Lineage Leukemia) in tumorigenesis

Room A123

The Mixed Lineage Leukemia (MLL) gene is a methyltransferase that aids in the chromatin modification of developmental genes in humans. The presence of the mutated MLL gene has been associated with the development of cancer. Previous research indicates that in every cancer associated with the mutated MLL gene, there is one normal functioning copy of the MLL gene. Our goal in this research is to see if knocking out the MLL gene function decreases tumorigenesis. We will use the CRISPR/Cas9 genome editing system. The MLL gRNA molecules have been designed and will be composed into the correct CRISPR/Cas9 vector. This construct will be used to transfect a variety of human cell lines, starting with lung cancer cells. After the transfection, we will use the microscope to see how many cells are alive. The cells will be analyzed for apoptotic death using an apoptosis assay. This is because based on prior research, knocking out the MLL gene should induce apoptosis. We confirm the knocking out of MLL through genome sequencing. Based on the analysis, we want to see if there is greater apoptotic death in the cells that were treated with the vector in comparison with the control cells. We hope to use this data/research as a way of developing a MLL-targeted therapy for leukemia and other solid cancers.