Event Title

Session 3I: The Effects of High Levels of CO2 on the Proliferation of Skeletal Muscle Stem Cells

Session Number

Session 3I: 1st Presentation

Advisor(s)

: Drs. Emilia Lecuona and Jacob Sznajder, Northwestern University

Location

Room A119

Start Date

26-4-2018 12:40 PM

End Date

26-4-2018 1:25 PM

Abstract

Patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) or adult respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) may develop increased levels of CO2 in their blood, also known as hypercapnia. Many of these patients also suffer from muscle dysfunction, which decreases their quality of life. We have previously found that there is a direct correlation between hypercapnia and muscle atrophy. The current study focuses on how hypercapnia affects the repair process in the skeletal muscle. In order to effectively repair an injury, skeletal muscle stem cells must proliferate and differentiate, both of which processes were affected by hypercapnia in an in vitro model. Cell proliferation requires energy and stem cells usually use glycolysis as a source of energy when proliferating. We hypothesize that cells exposed to high levels of CO2 have a decreased glycolytic activity. To study this hypothesis, we exposed C2C12 myoblasts to high CO2 levels for 3 days and analyzed by qPCR key enzymes of the glycolytic pathway. The results will be presented at IMSAloquium. As the investigation continues, its results can allow scientists to better understand the effects of hypercapnia on patients with lung associated skeletal muscle dysfunction.

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Apr 26th, 12:40 PM Apr 26th, 1:25 PM

Session 3I: The Effects of High Levels of CO2 on the Proliferation of Skeletal Muscle Stem Cells

Room A119

Patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) or adult respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) may develop increased levels of CO2 in their blood, also known as hypercapnia. Many of these patients also suffer from muscle dysfunction, which decreases their quality of life. We have previously found that there is a direct correlation between hypercapnia and muscle atrophy. The current study focuses on how hypercapnia affects the repair process in the skeletal muscle. In order to effectively repair an injury, skeletal muscle stem cells must proliferate and differentiate, both of which processes were affected by hypercapnia in an in vitro model. Cell proliferation requires energy and stem cells usually use glycolysis as a source of energy when proliferating. We hypothesize that cells exposed to high levels of CO2 have a decreased glycolytic activity. To study this hypothesis, we exposed C2C12 myoblasts to high CO2 levels for 3 days and analyzed by qPCR key enzymes of the glycolytic pathway. The results will be presented at IMSAloquium. As the investigation continues, its results can allow scientists to better understand the effects of hypercapnia on patients with lung associated skeletal muscle dysfunction.