Event Title

Pathogenic Resistance in Soil Microbes

Advisor(s)

Dr. John Thurmond, Illinois Mathematics and Science Academy

Location

Room B133

Start Date

26-4-2019 10:25 AM

End Date

26-4-2019 10:40 AM

Abstract

Antimicrobial resistance has become a prevalent phenomenon and now poses a great threat to public health. To combat the growing threat of such illnesses, several researchers have tested for new microbes from the soil that exhibit antimicrobial properties against these newly resistant pathogens. Our drug discovery project expands on the work of these previous studies and aims to identify novel soil microbes with pathogenic resistance that will be viable candidates for new drugs. In our approach to addressing the issue, we collected soil samples around Illinois and used the serial dilution method to extract individual bacterial colonies. After creating master plates from the isolated bacteria, we screened the samples against 6 pathogens utilizing the spread-patch technique. In our second soil sample, we found four bacterial colonies that were resistant against Acinetobacter Baylyi, with the zones of inhibition ranging from 1 mm to 3 mm. To determine whether the bacteria are novel, we have extracted their DNA through PCR amplification and have sent them for sequencing. The results have yet to be released.

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Apr 26th, 10:25 AM Apr 26th, 10:40 AM

Pathogenic Resistance in Soil Microbes

Room B133

Antimicrobial resistance has become a prevalent phenomenon and now poses a great threat to public health. To combat the growing threat of such illnesses, several researchers have tested for new microbes from the soil that exhibit antimicrobial properties against these newly resistant pathogens. Our drug discovery project expands on the work of these previous studies and aims to identify novel soil microbes with pathogenic resistance that will be viable candidates for new drugs. In our approach to addressing the issue, we collected soil samples around Illinois and used the serial dilution method to extract individual bacterial colonies. After creating master plates from the isolated bacteria, we screened the samples against 6 pathogens utilizing the spread-patch technique. In our second soil sample, we found four bacterial colonies that were resistant against Acinetobacter Baylyi, with the zones of inhibition ranging from 1 mm to 3 mm. To determine whether the bacteria are novel, we have extracted their DNA through PCR amplification and have sent them for sequencing. The results have yet to be released.