Event Title

The genetic basis of bone density and its application to osteoporosis treatment

Advisor(s)

Frank Ko, Rush University

Meghan Moran, Rush University

Location

Room B115

Start Date

26-4-2019 10:25 AM

End Date

26-4-2019 10:40 AM

Abstract

Osteoporosis (loss of bone mass) is a common disease that leads to a loss of bone mass and an increase in risk of bone fracture. Current drugs stop the progression of bone loss; although teriparatide and abaloparatide do promote bone growth, they increase osteosarcoma risk (Forteo) and have limitations on treatment time (Tymlos), so a new therapy is needed. The current study aims to determine the heritability and genetic basis of high bone mass (HBM) in Carworth Farms White (CFW) mice. In vivo x-rays were taken for 30 female and 30 male mice, and the distal portion of the femur was analyzed for bone density. Accordingly, three breeding groups were created: normal bone mass (NBM) x NBM, HBM x HBM, and HBM x NBM, with offspring bone densities measured using contact x-ray at 8 weeks of age. No significant difference in bone densities was found for the offspring groups (p = 0.752). After preliminary data analysis, it appears that the phenotype for bone density is polygenic and may be heritable. Ultimately, understanding the genetic basis of this HBM may lead to novel osteoporosis therapeutics, which may include gene therapy and personalized medicine for those suffering from the effects of osteoporosis.

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Apr 26th, 10:25 AM Apr 26th, 10:40 AM

The genetic basis of bone density and its application to osteoporosis treatment

Room B115

Osteoporosis (loss of bone mass) is a common disease that leads to a loss of bone mass and an increase in risk of bone fracture. Current drugs stop the progression of bone loss; although teriparatide and abaloparatide do promote bone growth, they increase osteosarcoma risk (Forteo) and have limitations on treatment time (Tymlos), so a new therapy is needed. The current study aims to determine the heritability and genetic basis of high bone mass (HBM) in Carworth Farms White (CFW) mice. In vivo x-rays were taken for 30 female and 30 male mice, and the distal portion of the femur was analyzed for bone density. Accordingly, three breeding groups were created: normal bone mass (NBM) x NBM, HBM x HBM, and HBM x NBM, with offspring bone densities measured using contact x-ray at 8 weeks of age. No significant difference in bone densities was found for the offspring groups (p = 0.752). After preliminary data analysis, it appears that the phenotype for bone density is polygenic and may be heritable. Ultimately, understanding the genetic basis of this HBM may lead to novel osteoporosis therapeutics, which may include gene therapy and personalized medicine for those suffering from the effects of osteoporosis.