Event Title

Analyzing the Diffraction of Light Through High Entropy Alloys to Predict Elemental Interactions

Session Number

Project ID: ENGN 8

Advisor(s)

Abhijit Phakatkar; University of Illinois at Chicago

Dr. Tolou Shokuhfar; University of Illinois at Chicago

Discipline

Engineering

Start Date

22-4-2020 8:30 AM

End Date

22-4-2020 8:45 AM

Abstract

In recent years, high entropy alloys (HEAs) have become a new research focus in the engineering, materials, and nanomaterials community due to it containing several major elements without a clear base element in contrast to typical metallic alloys. The influence of varying alloying elements was studied in terms of crystal structure by using X-Ray Diffraction (XRD), and the examination of crystal structures and crystal defects in greater detail were carried out using Selected Area Diffraction (SAD), which is performed inside a Transmission Electron Microscope (TEM). I am currently in the early stages of my investigation and am spending time developing my skills using binary alloys, such as Fe-Cu, and well-researched nanoparticles, such as Iron Oxide. Along with learning new techniques, I have been reading extensively on other research articles related to high entropy alloys and the characteristics of nanoparticles. As of right now, the experiment is still ongoing, which means that I currently have no data or conclusive information.

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Apr 22nd, 8:30 AM Apr 22nd, 8:45 AM

Analyzing the Diffraction of Light Through High Entropy Alloys to Predict Elemental Interactions

In recent years, high entropy alloys (HEAs) have become a new research focus in the engineering, materials, and nanomaterials community due to it containing several major elements without a clear base element in contrast to typical metallic alloys. The influence of varying alloying elements was studied in terms of crystal structure by using X-Ray Diffraction (XRD), and the examination of crystal structures and crystal defects in greater detail were carried out using Selected Area Diffraction (SAD), which is performed inside a Transmission Electron Microscope (TEM). I am currently in the early stages of my investigation and am spending time developing my skills using binary alloys, such as Fe-Cu, and well-researched nanoparticles, such as Iron Oxide. Along with learning new techniques, I have been reading extensively on other research articles related to high entropy alloys and the characteristics of nanoparticles. As of right now, the experiment is still ongoing, which means that I currently have no data or conclusive information.