Event Title

Chimeric Dynorphin-Morphine and their Resulting Interactions with Kappa and Mu Opioid Receptors

Session Number

Project ID: CHEM 09

Advisor(s)

Dr. Joseph Golab; Illinois Mathematics and Science Academy

Discipline

Chemistry

Start Date

20-4-2022 10:05 AM

End Date

20-4-2022 10:20 AM

Abstract

Opioids are a drug that is often used as an analgesic. They work by binding to receptors in the brain, creatively known as “opioid receptors.” There are three main opioid receptors: the kappa receptor, the mu receptor, and the delta receptor. The delta and mu receptors are responsible for euphoria, addiction, and the most dangerous aspects of overdose, as well as the quintessential analgesic effect. The delta receptor is also responsible for analgesia, without the other dangerous side effects, although it must be noted that the delta receptor also triggers dysphoria. In this experiment, I tested an engineered form of morphine, as well as an engineered form of heroin, for how well they could bind with a preference towards the delta receptor, and compared my results against dynorphin, standard morphine and heroin, leu-enkephalin, and standard commercial delta receptor agonists to evaluate their efficiency.

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Apr 20th, 10:05 AM Apr 20th, 10:20 AM

Chimeric Dynorphin-Morphine and their Resulting Interactions with Kappa and Mu Opioid Receptors

Opioids are a drug that is often used as an analgesic. They work by binding to receptors in the brain, creatively known as “opioid receptors.” There are three main opioid receptors: the kappa receptor, the mu receptor, and the delta receptor. The delta and mu receptors are responsible for euphoria, addiction, and the most dangerous aspects of overdose, as well as the quintessential analgesic effect. The delta receptor is also responsible for analgesia, without the other dangerous side effects, although it must be noted that the delta receptor also triggers dysphoria. In this experiment, I tested an engineered form of morphine, as well as an engineered form of heroin, for how well they could bind with a preference towards the delta receptor, and compared my results against dynorphin, standard morphine and heroin, leu-enkephalin, and standard commercial delta receptor agonists to evaluate their efficiency.