Event Title

The Relationship Between COVID-19 Death Rates and Socioeconomic Status

Advisor(s)

Patrick Kearney; Illinois Mathematics and Science Academy

Discipline

Behavioral and Social Sciences

Start Date

21-4-2021 9:10 AM

End Date

21-4-2021 9:25 AM

Abstract

Since the beginning of COVID-19 pandemic in early 2020, many have wondered if COVID-19 disproportionately affects minorities and low-income individuals. Studies have shown that minorities, especially Black and Latino, and low-income groups do in fact have higher COVID-19 transmission rates compared to White Americans. However, not much research has been conducted regarding the relationship between COVID-19 death rates and income level. The goal of this project was to find the relationship between COVID-19 death rates and a few socioeconomic factors: average income, race, and population density. Every county in two U.S. states, Oregon and New Mexico, were the test subjects of this project. Public data regarding these categories was compiled and calculated into a few different factors. To find the COVID-19 death rate in any given county, we divided the total number of COVID-19 deaths by the total number of confirmed COVID-19 cases (as of March 2021). Upon analyzing the data, we have concluded that there was no significant correlation between the socioeconomic factors previously mentioned and COVID-19 death rates.

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Apr 21st, 9:10 AM Apr 21st, 9:25 AM

The Relationship Between COVID-19 Death Rates and Socioeconomic Status

Since the beginning of COVID-19 pandemic in early 2020, many have wondered if COVID-19 disproportionately affects minorities and low-income individuals. Studies have shown that minorities, especially Black and Latino, and low-income groups do in fact have higher COVID-19 transmission rates compared to White Americans. However, not much research has been conducted regarding the relationship between COVID-19 death rates and income level. The goal of this project was to find the relationship between COVID-19 death rates and a few socioeconomic factors: average income, race, and population density. Every county in two U.S. states, Oregon and New Mexico, were the test subjects of this project. Public data regarding these categories was compiled and calculated into a few different factors. To find the COVID-19 death rate in any given county, we divided the total number of COVID-19 deaths by the total number of confirmed COVID-19 cases (as of March 2021). Upon analyzing the data, we have concluded that there was no significant correlation between the socioeconomic factors previously mentioned and COVID-19 death rates.