Event Title

Use of Data Analytics to Spot Educational Discrimination – Part II -A Focus on The Effect of Discipline on Test Scores

Advisor(s)

Dr. Angel Alvarez; Northwestern University, Feinberg School of Medicine

Discipline

Behavioral and Social Sciences

Start Date

21-4-2021 9:10 AM

End Date

21-4-2021 9:25 AM

Abstract

We used data analytics to find potential inequities within Chicago Public Schools (CPS) policies that negatively affect marginalized groups. Currently, there is inequity with the CPS system: there is a lack of educational opportunities for students of color and students of lower socioeconomic status. There is also an issue of heavy police involvement in schools through school resource officers (SROs). We looked into the use of police notifications in both high schools and elementary schools and found stark racial disparities in the use of police in elementary schools. This was due to the lack of SROs in elementary schools. Using publicly accessible CPS data, we analyzed data regarding police involvement and out-of-school suspensions (OSSs) per 100 students in comparison with student demographics. Schools with higher percentages of Black students have a significantly higher number of police notifications and disciplinary actions of higher severity. We analyzed the data concerning discipline in conjunction with student demographics and test scores per school. This could potentially further reveal racial disparities between predominantly White schools and predominantly Black schools. Furthermore, it could prove severe disciplinary action does not solve the problem of student insubordination, but rather criminalize them for minor misbehavior.

Share

COinS
 
Apr 21st, 9:10 AM Apr 21st, 9:25 AM

Use of Data Analytics to Spot Educational Discrimination – Part II -A Focus on The Effect of Discipline on Test Scores

We used data analytics to find potential inequities within Chicago Public Schools (CPS) policies that negatively affect marginalized groups. Currently, there is inequity with the CPS system: there is a lack of educational opportunities for students of color and students of lower socioeconomic status. There is also an issue of heavy police involvement in schools through school resource officers (SROs). We looked into the use of police notifications in both high schools and elementary schools and found stark racial disparities in the use of police in elementary schools. This was due to the lack of SROs in elementary schools. Using publicly accessible CPS data, we analyzed data regarding police involvement and out-of-school suspensions (OSSs) per 100 students in comparison with student demographics. Schools with higher percentages of Black students have a significantly higher number of police notifications and disciplinary actions of higher severity. We analyzed the data concerning discipline in conjunction with student demographics and test scores per school. This could potentially further reveal racial disparities between predominantly White schools and predominantly Black schools. Furthermore, it could prove severe disciplinary action does not solve the problem of student insubordination, but rather criminalize them for minor misbehavior.