Event Title

Efficiencies for Dark Lepton Triggers

Advisor(s)

Dr. Peter Dong; Illinois Mathematics and Science Academy

Discipline

Physical Science

Start Date

21-4-2021 9:10 AM

End Date

21-4-2021 9:25 AM

Abstract

Since dark photons produce lepton jets with low muon energies, they are poorly accepted by the existing single muon and dimuon triggers because existing triggers fail to accept muons with low energies. To accept more dark photon events, two tri-muon triggers were created, one being a level one trigger and the other being a high-level trigger, with the level one trigger’s first muon, second muon, and third muon energy being 5 GeV, 3 GeV, and 3 GeV respectively, and the high-level trigger’s muon energies being 10 GeV, 5 GeV and 5 GeV. In order to measure the efficiencies for the tri muon trigger, the CMS framework was used to test the triggers on generated events and see how many events the new trigger accepts that the old ones missed. Testing and looking at how many events that the new triggers accept but the old ones miss for the missing pT trigger, which measures how much pT is being missed by the detector for each event, as well as other triggers which could be relevant to the dark photon analysis.

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Apr 21st, 9:10 AM Apr 21st, 9:25 AM

Efficiencies for Dark Lepton Triggers

Since dark photons produce lepton jets with low muon energies, they are poorly accepted by the existing single muon and dimuon triggers because existing triggers fail to accept muons with low energies. To accept more dark photon events, two tri-muon triggers were created, one being a level one trigger and the other being a high-level trigger, with the level one trigger’s first muon, second muon, and third muon energy being 5 GeV, 3 GeV, and 3 GeV respectively, and the high-level trigger’s muon energies being 10 GeV, 5 GeV and 5 GeV. In order to measure the efficiencies for the tri muon trigger, the CMS framework was used to test the triggers on generated events and see how many events the new trigger accepts that the old ones missed. Testing and looking at how many events that the new triggers accept but the old ones miss for the missing pT trigger, which measures how much pT is being missed by the detector for each event, as well as other triggers which could be relevant to the dark photon analysis.