Event Title

Assessing User Feedback to Optimize the FoodSteps Mobile Health Intervention

Session Number

Project ID: BHVSO 03

Advisor(s)

Andrea K. Graham, Ph.D., Northwestern University, Feinberg School of Medicine

Discipline

Behavioral and Social Sciences

Start Date

20-4-2022 8:50 AM

End Date

20-4-2022 9:05 AM

Abstract

Mobile interventions created through research studies often have not focused on user preferences, and consequently, people are less likely to use the app once it enters the real world. FoodSteps is a mobile intervention to help users manage weight and reduce binge eating and was designed with extensive user input through user-centered design methods. In this

study, 30 people with recurrent binge eating and obesity completed a 16-week clinical trial of the FoodSteps intervention and participated in semi-structured interviews following treatment regarding their experiences with FoodSteps. Interview transcripts were analyzed, and five themes emerged regarding program recommendations. Participants wanted to choose the method of delivery of auto messages (e.g., text, app notification) and review and edit past data in the eating log. Participants wanted a greater variety of goals and challenges. Participants desired a more interactive design (e.g., videos, peer competition, incentives), and recommended adding a support group. Understanding the experiences of people who have completed the intervention revealed important considerations for future versions of the mobile intervention. The FoodSteps team will continue to incorporate user feedback to improve the intervention to meet the needs and preferences of its users.

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Apr 20th, 8:50 AM Apr 20th, 9:05 AM

Assessing User Feedback to Optimize the FoodSteps Mobile Health Intervention

Mobile interventions created through research studies often have not focused on user preferences, and consequently, people are less likely to use the app once it enters the real world. FoodSteps is a mobile intervention to help users manage weight and reduce binge eating and was designed with extensive user input through user-centered design methods. In this

study, 30 people with recurrent binge eating and obesity completed a 16-week clinical trial of the FoodSteps intervention and participated in semi-structured interviews following treatment regarding their experiences with FoodSteps. Interview transcripts were analyzed, and five themes emerged regarding program recommendations. Participants wanted to choose the method of delivery of auto messages (e.g., text, app notification) and review and edit past data in the eating log. Participants wanted a greater variety of goals and challenges. Participants desired a more interactive design (e.g., videos, peer competition, incentives), and recommended adding a support group. Understanding the experiences of people who have completed the intervention revealed important considerations for future versions of the mobile intervention. The FoodSteps team will continue to incorporate user feedback to improve the intervention to meet the needs and preferences of its users.