Event Title

Continuous Temperature Measurements in Donor Hearts during Organ Procurement

Session Number

Project ID: BIO 06

Advisor(s)

Dr. Daniel Rodgers, University of Chicago

Dr. David Onsager, University of Chicago

Dr. Valluvan Jeevanandam, University of Chicago

Discipline

Biology

Start Date

20-4-2022 9:10 AM

End Date

20-4-2022 9:25 AM

Abstract

In-the-current standard-of-care mechanism for donor heart transport, the organ is immersed in preservation solution inside of a sterile plastic jar, triple-bagged, and placed inside a cooler filled with ice. Literature describing the relationship between transport conditions and post-transplant outcomes is very limited. Therefore, we aimed to investigate the relationship of donor heart temperature with major elements of post-transplant success.

This pilot study utilizes a proprietary-continuous-temperature-monitoring (TAG) prototype-placed-inside the organ transport device during procurement (Gate Scientific, Los Angeles, CA). There was no-direct organ-TAG contact during Phase I, during which the conditions of the surrounding environment were assessed (ambient temperature and ice). Phase II of the study will investigate the temperature conditions associated with direct organ contact, which will be evaluated to see if optimal hypothermic temperatures (4-8°C) are achieved.

The ambient-temperature recordings of the organ cooler, prior to adding the ice, was on average 21.5 ± 1.67°C over 1 hour. The average temperature of the ice in the organ cooler was -0.43 ± 2.06°C over 3 hours with R² = 0.3109.

The TAG successfully measured continuous temperature readings of ambient and internal-transport-conditions inside a standard-of-care organ-transport-device. TAG technology in conjunction-with Phase II investigations may provide insight into the relationship of hypothermic organ transport conditions and clinical outcomes.

Share

COinS
 
Apr 20th, 9:10 AM Apr 20th, 9:25 AM

Continuous Temperature Measurements in Donor Hearts during Organ Procurement

In-the-current standard-of-care mechanism for donor heart transport, the organ is immersed in preservation solution inside of a sterile plastic jar, triple-bagged, and placed inside a cooler filled with ice. Literature describing the relationship between transport conditions and post-transplant outcomes is very limited. Therefore, we aimed to investigate the relationship of donor heart temperature with major elements of post-transplant success.

This pilot study utilizes a proprietary-continuous-temperature-monitoring (TAG) prototype-placed-inside the organ transport device during procurement (Gate Scientific, Los Angeles, CA). There was no-direct organ-TAG contact during Phase I, during which the conditions of the surrounding environment were assessed (ambient temperature and ice). Phase II of the study will investigate the temperature conditions associated with direct organ contact, which will be evaluated to see if optimal hypothermic temperatures (4-8°C) are achieved.

The ambient-temperature recordings of the organ cooler, prior to adding the ice, was on average 21.5 ± 1.67°C over 1 hour. The average temperature of the ice in the organ cooler was -0.43 ± 2.06°C over 3 hours with R² = 0.3109.

The TAG successfully measured continuous temperature readings of ambient and internal-transport-conditions inside a standard-of-care organ-transport-device. TAG technology in conjunction-with Phase II investigations may provide insight into the relationship of hypothermic organ transport conditions and clinical outcomes.