Event Title

Analysis of the Shinnery Oak Shrub Using High Resolution Unmanned Aerial Vehicle Imagery

Session Number

Project ID: ENVR 01

Advisor(s)

Dr. Chuck Cannon, Morton Arboretum

Discipline

Environmental Science

Start Date

20-4-2022 9:30 AM

End Date

20-4-2022 9:45 AM

Abstract

The Shinnery Oak (Quercus havardii) is a low clonal deciduous shrub native to the Great Plains of North America. Little research has been done on the disappearing specie’s ecology as the Shinnery Oak undesirably dominates the vegetation growing in its environment. Nonetheless, the species’ restoration is vital to biodiversity, the well being of endangered species in the community, and livestock production. We used the DJI Phantom 4 drone to photograph the study site set in Western Texas. Photos of the area were taken over three different time periods: June, January, and March, depicting three clones of varying size and shape. Three clones were analyzed to compare differences in canopy size, color, and height resulting from seasonal changes. The dense cloud, 3D model, and orthomosaic were created after alignment and optimization of the photos. The orthomosaic was used to analyze distances between motts, sizes, and shapes of motts through R packages. Furthermore, error points and point density were compared to assess the accuracy of each data set.

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Apr 20th, 9:30 AM Apr 20th, 9:45 AM

Analysis of the Shinnery Oak Shrub Using High Resolution Unmanned Aerial Vehicle Imagery

The Shinnery Oak (Quercus havardii) is a low clonal deciduous shrub native to the Great Plains of North America. Little research has been done on the disappearing specie’s ecology as the Shinnery Oak undesirably dominates the vegetation growing in its environment. Nonetheless, the species’ restoration is vital to biodiversity, the well being of endangered species in the community, and livestock production. We used the DJI Phantom 4 drone to photograph the study site set in Western Texas. Photos of the area were taken over three different time periods: June, January, and March, depicting three clones of varying size and shape. Three clones were analyzed to compare differences in canopy size, color, and height resulting from seasonal changes. The dense cloud, 3D model, and orthomosaic were created after alignment and optimization of the photos. The orthomosaic was used to analyze distances between motts, sizes, and shapes of motts through R packages. Furthermore, error points and point density were compared to assess the accuracy of each data set.