Event Title

Design and Synthesis of Analogs of Dasatinib as Potential Treatments for Chronic Myeloid Leukemia and Acute Lymphatic Leukemia

Session Number

Project ID: MEDH 07

Advisor(s)

Dr. John Thurmond; Illinois Mathematics and Science Academy

Discipline

Medical and Health Sciences

Start Date

19-4-2023 10:35 AM

End Date

19-4-2023 10:50 AM

Abstract

Danistab has demonstrated a quick molecular response and has proved itself to be useful in treating many cases of Chronic Myeloid Leukemia (CML) and Acute Lymphatic Leukemia (ALL). However, there has been no published research on how the alteration of the structure of Dansitab could increase binding affinity as well as the efficacy of its synthesis in our bodies. Using a computer aided we created novel compounds based on dasatinib and improved its ability to bind to proteins, enhancing its effectiveness, reducing needed material, and improving its ability to be synthesized. Our designed compounds included the improvement of the molecules polarity, bonding, compatibility, solubility, and toxicity. One of the most important factors that we focused on in our designs was the rate of human absorption (HIA) to see if our drug would be easily absorbed in the human body. This ultimately increased the affinity of our designed molecules with the binding site, escalating the possibility for inhibition and the efficiency in its synthesis.

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Apr 19th, 10:35 AM Apr 19th, 10:50 AM

Design and Synthesis of Analogs of Dasatinib as Potential Treatments for Chronic Myeloid Leukemia and Acute Lymphatic Leukemia

Danistab has demonstrated a quick molecular response and has proved itself to be useful in treating many cases of Chronic Myeloid Leukemia (CML) and Acute Lymphatic Leukemia (ALL). However, there has been no published research on how the alteration of the structure of Dansitab could increase binding affinity as well as the efficacy of its synthesis in our bodies. Using a computer aided we created novel compounds based on dasatinib and improved its ability to bind to proteins, enhancing its effectiveness, reducing needed material, and improving its ability to be synthesized. Our designed compounds included the improvement of the molecules polarity, bonding, compatibility, solubility, and toxicity. One of the most important factors that we focused on in our designs was the rate of human absorption (HIA) to see if our drug would be easily absorbed in the human body. This ultimately increased the affinity of our designed molecules with the binding site, escalating the possibility for inhibition and the efficiency in its synthesis.