Title

The Redistribution of Public School Funding

Location

Room A152

Document Type

Presentation

Type

EnACT

Start Date

11-4-2018 9:30 AM

End Date

11-4-2018 10:00 AM

Abstract

Chicago has historically actively encouraged race-based and economic segregation within the city. This “historical” problem, however, continues to exist today, and has more recently been exacerbated by corporate influences. Many top-level administrators do not view segregation as its problem, and instead chose to put profits first: financing the expansion of selective enrollment schools, the creation of experimental charter schools, the adoption of of “meritocratic” programs that only leave poorly performing schools in worse condition, and leaving schools in poorer (and predominantly Black) neighborhoods) with less resources.

As such, we advocate for a set of three policies. First, Chicago Public Schools must cut all ties and commitments to corporate influences, and discontinue its Charter Schools Program. It must begin devoting resources to studying, understanding, and developing specific solutions to the problems individual schools in lower-income neighborhoods face. Second, it must redistribute its funding and expand its focus to these disadvantaged schools and the students within them. This includes leaving behind incentivization programs that do nothing to help students in poor performing schools. Thirdly, Chicago Public Schools must thoroughly involve the general population in the running of schools. This means expanding the powers of Local School Councils, and making more positions within top-level administration require democratic election.

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Apr 11th, 9:30 AM Apr 11th, 10:00 AM

The Redistribution of Public School Funding

Room A152

Chicago has historically actively encouraged race-based and economic segregation within the city. This “historical” problem, however, continues to exist today, and has more recently been exacerbated by corporate influences. Many top-level administrators do not view segregation as its problem, and instead chose to put profits first: financing the expansion of selective enrollment schools, the creation of experimental charter schools, the adoption of of “meritocratic” programs that only leave poorly performing schools in worse condition, and leaving schools in poorer (and predominantly Black) neighborhoods) with less resources.

As such, we advocate for a set of three policies. First, Chicago Public Schools must cut all ties and commitments to corporate influences, and discontinue its Charter Schools Program. It must begin devoting resources to studying, understanding, and developing specific solutions to the problems individual schools in lower-income neighborhoods face. Second, it must redistribute its funding and expand its focus to these disadvantaged schools and the students within them. This includes leaving behind incentivization programs that do nothing to help students in poor performing schools. Thirdly, Chicago Public Schools must thoroughly involve the general population in the running of schools. This means expanding the powers of Local School Councils, and making more positions within top-level administration require democratic election.