Session Number

Keynote Address

Start Date

28-2-2014 8:15 AM

End Date

28-2-2014 9:00 AM

Description

When we attend to our students' learning–not just our teaching–we can become significantly more effective in helping them learn. This is a simple idea but not an easy one, and it may take some work to figure out how to do it. Let's explore some ways to illuminate students' current thinking (accurate or not), promote meaningful student discourse (helping them do more of the work), and collaborate with colleagues (thinking together). Benefit from "lessons learned" and discover some worthwhile resources that can help you make the shift and may even help to manage new standards and upcoming assessments.

Comments

Sendhil Revuluri, a 1990 graduate of IMSA, studied physics and mathematics at the University of Chicago and traded equity derivatives for eight years. In 2003, he helped found the Bronx Academy of Letters, a new public secondary school, in New York. In 2008, he returned to Chicago as the Senior Instructional Specialist for secondary mathematics at the Chicago Public Schools. In this role, he worked with colleagues in mathematics and across disciplines to manage the implementation of curriculum, teacher supports, and assessments in more than 40 high schools, as well as influencing other aspects of mathematics teaching and learning in the district. Sendhil is a Senior Program Associate with the Learning Sciences Research Institute at the University of Illinois at Chicago. The Institute is committed to multidisciplinary learning and to improving learning environments for 21st century students around the globe.

Streaming Media

Share

COinS
 
Feb 28th, 8:15 AM Feb 28th, 9:00 AM

Keynote Address: It's 10 am - Do You Know Where Your Students Are?

When we attend to our students' learning–not just our teaching–we can become significantly more effective in helping them learn. This is a simple idea but not an easy one, and it may take some work to figure out how to do it. Let's explore some ways to illuminate students' current thinking (accurate or not), promote meaningful student discourse (helping them do more of the work), and collaborate with colleagues (thinking together). Benefit from "lessons learned" and discover some worthwhile resources that can help you make the shift and may even help to manage new standards and upcoming assessments.